Friday, April 10, 2009

MALIK,s TOYOTA L.C INFO-PEDIA


This informaction is collected from
internet after searching & surfing thousands of sites related to
Toyota landcrusier then create this hard to find informaction in this
Data-Base by SUNDEEP MALIK for his knowlizebase as his
hobby Every one can use it.





my link -
malik4xxx@gmail.com








TABLE OF CONTENTS


=================


1.0 Disclaimer


2.0 The History of Toyota


3.0 Introduction


4.0 Body Styles


4.1 Availability
(Model Year)


4.2 Specifications


4.3 Stock Curb
Weights (lbs)


5.0 Engines


5.1 Gas Engines


5.2 Diesel Engines


5.3 Other Engine
Suppliers


5.4 Engine
Specifications


5.5 Availability
(Model Year)


6.0 Engine/Chassis
Combinations (Production Year)


6.1 Selected Country
Engine/Chassis Sales Figures (Model Year)


7.0 Performance/Fuel
Economy


8.0 Transmissions &
Transfer Cases


8.1 Transmission &
Transfer Case Ratios (All :1)


9.0 Axles


9.1 Axle Codes


10.0 Production Codes


11.0 Body Colour Codes


12.0 Decoding Your ID
Plates


13.0 40 Series Specific
Info


13.1 Production
Timeline (US/Canada)


13.2 More 40
Production Info


14.0 55 Series Specific
Info


14.1 Production
Timeline (US/Canada)


14.2 More 55
Production Info


15.0 60 Series Specific
Info


15.1 Production Info


16.0 80 Series Specific
Info


16.1 Full Time 4WD


16.2 Locking
Differentials


17.0 Buying/Inspecting a
Land Cruiser


17.1 Engine


17.1.1 Diesel
Engine


17.1.2 Gas
Engine


17.2 Cooling System


17.3 Electrical


17.4
Transmission/Transfer


17.5 Driveshafts


17.6 Rear Axle


17.7 Front Axle


17.8 Steering


17.9 Brakes


17.10 Suspension


17.11 Body


17.12 Frame


17.13 Inspection
Checklist


18.0 Drivetrain Swaps


18.1 Non-Toyota
Equipment


18.2 Diesel Engine
Swaps


18.2.1 Isuzu
Engine Specs


18.2.2 Cummins
Engine Specs


18.2.3 GM
Diesel Engine


18.2.3.1
GM Engine Specs


18.2.3.2
GM Diesel Swap Specifics


18.2.4 Nissan
Diesel Specs


18.3 Gas Engine
Conversions


18.3.1 GM
Engine Specs


18.3.2 Ford
Engine Specs


18.4 Transmission
Swaps


18.5 Transfer
Case/Axle Swaps


19.0 Maintenance and
Modifications


19.1 Aluminum Tubs -
Rob Mullen


19.2 Breather
Relocation - Rob Mullen


19.3 G.M. HEI
distributors for F/2F Motors - David Dannenberg


19.4 Glow Plugs -
Rob Mullen


19.5 Owner's Manual
Maintenance Schedules - Toyota


19.5.1 Gas
Powered Vehicles (2F-1983)


19.5.2 Diesel
Powered Vehicles (B-1978)


19.5.3 Diesel
Powered Vehicles (3B-1983)


19.6 Ride Harshness
- Rob Mullen


19.7 Saginaw Power
Steering Conversion - Park Owens


19.8 Shackle
Reversals - Rob Mullen


19.9 Silicon Clutch
Diagnosis - John Barron


19.10 Steering
Wandering - Rob Mullen


19.11 Spring Over
Conversions - John Barron


19.12 Transmission
and Transfer Removal Tips - Rob Mullen


19.13 V8J40 Cooling
Tips - Fred Welland


19.14 Which Wheels
Work? - Rob Mullen


20.0 Land Cruiser Clubs


20.1 North America


20.2 Australia


20.3 Netherlands


21.0 Parts Suppliers


21.1 North America


21.2 Australia




1.0 Disclaimer


==============


Well, here goes. I've
decided to bite the bullet The information in this knowlize
base to be used AT YOUR OWN RISK. I am not responsible for any
death/dismemberment/ grief/increase of libido that any errors or
misinformation cause you! Also
Anything that looks wrong to you.


Sugessaion,s are welcomed






my mail - malik4xxx@gmail.com






malik4xxx@yahoo.co.in





2.0 The History of Toyota


=========================


NOTE: This section is
responsible for most of the delay in getting this version


of the FAQ out for two
reasons. First off, there is some very interesting


research I was hoping to
include, but it didn't come together the way I'd hoped.


The other reason is that
some of the information is not as well referenced as it


should be (I only have
secondary references for the Jeep stuff) If you feel


that I've somehow slighted
you by missing a reference, don't worry, I'm working


on them. You can speed
things up by dropping me a line. On with the show...








Trucks played a pivotal
role in the history of the Toyota Motor Company. In


most cases, the Land
Cruiser was the vehicle that carried the Toyota banner


into new markets.
However, a complete history of Toyota requires a look at


the man whos company
provided the capital and inital production facilities


necessary for the founding
of the Toyota Motor Company.





Sakichi Toyoda was born in
1867 in Yamaguchi, Japan. He had dedicated his


life to the invention of
an automatic textile loom. In 1907, he formed


Toyoda's Loom works, a
company that by 1930 had grown into the Toyoda


Automatic Loom Works
(TALW).





Although he shared the
inventiveness of his father, Kiichiro Toyoda did not


share the fascination with
looms. Instead Kiichiro dreamed of building


automobiles. In March
1930, he began to build a prototype engine in a corner


of the Toyoda Automatic
Loom Works factory. By January 29, 1934, Kiichiro had


made enough progress with
his engine design that TALW established an


Automobile Department.
The first engine, a 3.4l I6 dubbed the Type A was


completed in September
1934. The first complete automobile prototype, the


Model A1 was completed in
May 1935.





Due to restrictions on the
domestic automobile industry, Kiichiro decided that


would be better to focus
on the production of trucks. As a result, the first


prototype Toyota truck,
the Model G1 was completed on August 25, 1935.





In July 1936, it was
decided that the cars produced by TALW would be marketed


under the name "Toyota."
The name was chosen because it sounded better than


Toyoda, the katakana
characters used to represent it were more asthetically


pleasing and consisted of
eight strokes, a lucky number, and because the


character was similar to
the one representing growth. The Toyota Motor Co.,


Ltd. (TMC) was formed on
August 28, 1937.





The Koromo Plant was
officially opened in November of 1938. This plant would


later become known as the
Honsha Plant--the site of LandCruiser Production. The


first vehicle produced at
the new factory was the Model BM truck. A version of


the 75hp engine used in
this vehicle was to become the first engine in a Land


Cruiser.





In 1941, the Japanese
government instructed Toyota to produce a small, easily


manoueverable truck that
could be used in the expansion of their Pacific empire.


In response, Toyota
delivered prototypes of the 2-ton AK-10 in 1942.


Unfortunately, it proved
too cumbersome so production of light transport trucks


was left to Nissan. No
examples or photographs of the AK-10 vehicle exist. The


only evidence of the AK-10
is a rough sketch. The truck featured an upright


front grille, flat fenders
that angled down and back like the FJ40, and


headlights that mounted
above the fenders on either side of the radiator. It


had a folding windshield,
and the cowl comes straight down to the floor. The


rear tub does not exist as
such, instead, there is more of a stake-sided bed.


The spare tire stands
vertically on the inside of the back wall of the bed on


the driver's side. The
pumpkins have the familiar offset and look to be


similar in design to the
Land Cruiser 9.5" and have a 6 wheel-stud pattern.


Most of the driveline of
the truck was from the model BM truck.





The AK-10 arrived 1 year
after the initial MA1 General Purpose was delivered


to the U.S. Military by
Willys-Overland. The first shipment of MB "Jeeps"


didn't arrive in the
Pacific until 1943. As a result, it was highly unlikely


that Toyota had seen a
Jeep, never mind copied one. The Land Rover Series I


did not arrive on the
scene until 1949 so any influence on the precursor to


the Land Cruiser is
impossible.





TMC struggled throughout
World War II. It was conscripted into making aircraft


engines and tried to
continue producing trucks with what little raw materials


were available. After
Japan's surrender in 1945, Toyota was allowed to begin


production of trucks to
aid in the rebuilding of Japan. By 1947, production


had begun on the Model BM
truck and the Model SB small truck.





In 1950, the U.S. military
filed a special procurement order for 1000 4wd


vehicles to be used in the
Korean War. Unfortunately, at this time, I am


unfamiliar with what the
exact terms of the procurement order were. However,


here are the requirements
that led to the Willys-Overland MA1:





1. It must have a load
capacity of 600 pounds


2. The wheelbase must be
under 75 inches


3. The height must be
under 36 inches


4. The engine must run
smoothly from three to fifty miles per hour


5. It must have a
rectangular shaped body


6. It must have a two
speed transfer case with four wheel drive


7. It must have a
windshield that folds down


8. It must include three
bucket seats


9. It must have blackout
and driving lights


10. Gross vehicle weight
must be under 1200 pounds (Conley 1981, 20)





Toyota responded with a
prototype of the Model BJ on August 1, 1951. Its


characteristics were as
follows:





1. Load capacity?
Unknown


2. 94" wheelbase


3. Height? Unknown


4. Engine runs smoothly
from three to fifty miles per hour


5. Rectangular shaped
body


6. Single speed
transfer-case


7. Folding windshield


8. 2 bucket seets and
rear bench


9. No blackout lights


10. Gross vehicle weight
of ~3000lbs.





There is very little
correlation, considering the BJ has been accused by some


to be a copy of the Jeep.
The specifications are different because a


completely different
philosophy was employed in the design of the BJ. The


Willys had been designed
to be as light as possible, using an engine with


roots in automobiles.
Because of the low torque characteristics of the


engine, a two-speed
transfer case with extra gear reduction was used to allow


passage over rough
terrain. The BJ, on the other hand, was created using


components from 2 and 4
ton trucks. The torque from the 6-cylinder B-85


engine did not require the
extra gear reduction. Instead a 4 speed


transmission with a 5.53:1
first gear was employed to get a little more low-


end grunt.





The vehicle was dubbed the
"Toyota Jeep," possibly as a result of the wording


of the U.S. Army's
procurement order. Fortunately, the right to the "Jeep"


name was owned by Willys
who forced Toyota to choose another name. On June


24, 1954, the name "Land
Cruiser" was chosen.





In 1954, the first Land
Cruisers were exported to Pakistan.





In 1955, 23 Land Cruisers
were exported to Saudi Arabia. The vehicles proved


to be wildly popular and
exports grew steadily.





On Feb 21, 1956, the first
two Land Cruisers were exported to Venezuela.


These were quickly
followed exports to Burma, Malaysia, and Puerto Rico.





Toyota entered the African
market by sending Crowns and Land Cruisers to


Ethiopia. Because
marketing proved difficult with the large number of


languages spoken in
Africa, Toyota was forced to adopt the sales technique of


driving a sample vehicle
all over Africa and dealing direct with potential


purchasers.





The U.S.A. was somewhat
different in that in 1957, it received two Crowns


before any Land Cruisers.
However, the Crowns were found to perform poorly at


the higher speeds of
American Interstates. Toyota was forced to halt


passenger car importing in
1960, leaving only the Land Cruiser to bear the


company's name in the
United States.





Toyota did not make the
same mistake in Australia. The first vehicles sent


there were Land Cruisers.
They arrived in July 1959, and were marketed by


Theiss Sales as commercial
vehicles.





Toyota began to market the
Model DA60 truck, its first powered by a diesel


engine, in March 1957.
However, brand loyalty was strong in Japan so Toyota


was forced to establish
links to Hino Motors, a diesel truck manufacturer.


Hino would later provide
the B and H series diesel engines used in Land


Cruisers.





In May, 1959, Toyota do
Brasil began Land Cruiser assembly in Brazil. This


was the first case of
knock-down kits being assembled outside Japan. Land


Cruiser assembly started
in 1963 in Venezuela, 1970 in Indonesia and Pakistan


(although Pakistanni
production was terminated in 1986), and 1977 in Kenya,


and 1982 in Bangladesh.





Toyota's first exports to
Europe were to Denmark, in 1964. That was quickly


followed by exports to
Finland, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, Great


Britain, France, Italy,
Austria, Greece, and finally, Germany.





It was not until 1964 that
Toyota came to Canada. The first vehicles imported


were the Crown, Land
Cruiser, and Publica. The Publica proved to be


unsuitable for the
Canadian climate and was quickly withdrawn; however, by


1971, largely on the
strength of Land Cruiser sales, Toyota had become the


number one import brand in
Canada.





Throughout the history of
Toyota, it was the Land Cruiser that led the way


into new export markets
and proved Toyota toughness.





3.0 Introduction


================


Land Cruisers models are
identified by an alphanumeric code. The code


consists of the engine
series designation letter(s) and the frame desgination


number separated by a the
letter "J." For example a 2 door with short wheel


base and a 2F gasoline
engine would be a FJ40. There are also auxilliary


codes that follow the main
model code and give further information about the


vehicle. For instance,
the code FJ40LV-KCW is the vehicle mentioned above


produced between 01/75 and
07/80 with left hand drive, 4 Speed Transmission,


Hardtop, Rear "ambulance"
doors, and no roll bar produced for the European


market. The extra codes
are necessary because of the huge number of


variations of each vehicle
offered world-wide. There were 2500 versions of


the 60 series alone. All
the North American & most Australian Codes are


described later in the
FAQ. The only exception to the naming convention is


the 1951 BJ.





4.0 Body Styles


===============


All Land Cruiser bodies
(Except the Bundera and the 45 Wagon) are made by


Araco (Formerly Arakawa),
a division of Toyota. Araco also manufactures the


interiors for Land
Cruisers, Lexuses, and other Toyota cars and trucks.


Toyota manufactures the
Bundera/LandCruiser II, and Gifu Body manufactured the


45 Wagon. The remainder
of the vehicle (except in some cases the engines) is


manufactured at Toyota's
Honsya plant (Factory code A11)





SERIES DESCRIPTION


AK-10 Predecessor to the
Land Cruiser


BJ Very First Land
Cruiser! Flat fenders, round rear wheel wells,


(B-85) vertical front
grille


25 Looks more like 40
series except with no turn signals on the fenders


round rear wheel wells
and no headlight bezel


25 P Pickup version of
above


28 Similar to above
with a longer wheelbase


28 V Wagon version of
above


35 Very similar to a
25


38 Wagon


40 2 Door with
removable hard/soft top, folding windshield


41 Same as above


42 Essentially
identical to 40 series


43 V Slightly Longer
40.


43 W 2 Door version of
the 45 Wagon


44 2 Door even longer
wheelbase 40 (40 sized side windows followed by


smaller ones


45 C Cab & Chassis


L Pick-up with
square bed with tie-down loops on sides, removable


hard/soft top


S Pick-up with
rounded bed with bevel on top rim like a 40.


Had fixed hardtop until
approx 1964 then removable hardtop


W 4 door 40 series,
permanent top.


T VERY long 2 door
40 with 2 sets of 40 style side windows on HT


46 Same as 45T except
with 5 speed transmission & upgraded frame


47 V VERY long 2 door
with 2 sets of 40 style side windows on HT


47 L Identical to 45
Series except with H series engine


47 C Cab & Chassis


50 Brazillian made
Bandierante soft top similar to 40


50 V Bandierante hard top
similar to 40


50 VB Bandierante similar
to 43


55 P2BL Bardierante
extra-cab pickup. Similar to 45 series


55 B Bandierante short
bed pickup similar to 45 series


55 BL Bandierante long
bed pickup


55 Wagon with
narrower appearance than 40 series. Front grille looks


like <


60 Square bodied
wagon with a pair of round headlights


61 Similar to above
except with a turbo


62 Square bodied
wagon with 2 pairs of rectangular headlights


70 Square body 2 door
with non-removable doors/hard top, sloping


windshield and
fenders that are a cross of a 40 and a 60.


70 LD Light Duty (Called
"Bundera" in Australia) - 70 Series with 2L-T diesel


or 22R gas engine,
lighter axles used in the pickup (with the 8" ring


gear), removable
hard/soft top, and coil springs.


Bundera means
"Rock Wallaby" in an aboriginal language


71 Essentially
identical to the 70 series


71 LD Similar to 70
series except with squarer front end and smaller front


fenders


73 Like 70 series
with 2 doors but longer body/wheelbase.


73 LD Longer wheelbase
version of the 70 LD detailed above


74 Similar to 73
except with turbo engine


75 P Square bodied
pickup with removable steel top


75 V Square bodied
wagon with 2 doors and 2 windows per side in the rear


75 C Cab & Chassis


77 Four-door 70
series wagon


78 Virtually
identical to above


80 Current rounded
wagon


90 AKA
Challenger/Prado/Colorado. NOT really a Land Cruiser, just a


re-badged/re-bodied
IFS 4Runner.


MEGA Copy of a Hummer
developed WITH the assistance of AM General. Complete


with gear
reduction hubs, 4WS, Inboard 4 wheel disc brakes, Torsen LSD's


_WITH_LOCKS_,
adjustable rear tire pressure





4.1 Availability (Model Year)


-----------------------------


SERIES AUS
CANADA U.S. JAPAN


AK-10 ..... .....
..... 42-?


BJ ..... .....
..... 51-54


25 ..... NA?
58-59 55-59


28 ..... .....
..... .....


35 ..... NA
NA 60


40 ??-84 60-84
60-83 60-84


42 81-84 81-84
NA 82-84


43 ..... NA
NA .....


45 L ??-84 63-80%
63-67+ 60-67


S ..... 63-67?
63-67+ .....


W ..... 63?-68
63-67+ .....


46 ..... NA
NA 82-84


47 81-84 NA
NA .....


55 ..... 68-80
68-80 .....


60 ??-90 80-87
80-87 .....


61 86-90 NA
NA .....


62 85-90 88-89
88-89 .....


70 85- 85-87
NA 84-89


LD 85-92 NA
NA .....


73 85-90 NA
NA .....


74 85-90 NA
NA 85-89


75 P 85- 90?-#
NA NA


W 85- NA
NA .....


77 NA NA
NA 90-94


78 NA NA
NA 93-96


80 90- 92-
90- .....





+Some 67's were rebadged
as '68's


%Industrial use only
81-89?


#Industrial use only





4.2 Specifications


------------------


OVERALL WHEELBASE TRACK
SPRINGS SPR LEN* HANG WID#


SERIES LENGTH MM IN
FR/RR MM FR RR FR RR FR RR


BJ 3793 2400 94
1390/1350 LF LF


25 3838 2285 90
1390/1350 LF LF


40 3680 2285 90
1404/1400 LF LF 1070 1070 686 970


42 3680 2285 90
1404/1400 LF LF 1070 1070 686 970


43 W 3968 2430 96
1404/1400 LF LF 1125 1265 686 970


43 4038 2430 96
1404/1400 LF LF 1070 1265 686 970


45 L 4760 2950 116
1404/1400 LF LF 1070 1265 686 970


W 4630 2650 104
1404/1400 LF LF 1070 1265 686 970


S 4651 2650 104
1404/1400 LF LF 686 970


47 4760 2950 116
1404/1400 LF LF 1070 1265 686 970


50 3930 2285 90
1415/1400 LF LF


50 V 3930 2285 90
1415/1400 LF LF


VB 4395 2755
1415/1400 LF LF


55 4637 2700 106
1404/1400 LF LF 1071 1155 686 970


55 2BL 5300 3355
1415/1400 LF LF


B 4900 2955
1415/1400 LF LF


BL 5300 3355
1415/1400 LF LF


60 4576 2730 108
1485/1470 LF LF 1058 1160 796 1030


62 4576 2730 108
1485/1470 LF LF 1058 1160 796 1030


70 3476 2310 90
1415/1400 LF LF 1087 1156 640 940


LD 3476 2310 90
CO CO


73 4410 2600
1425/1400 LF LF


LD 4410 2600
1460/1440 CO CO


75 P 4995 2980
1415/1400 LF LF 1087 1156 640 940


W 4885 2980
1415/1400 LF LF 1087 1282 640 940


77
CO CO


80 4780 2850 112
1595/1600 CO CO


MEGA 5090 3395 134
1775/1775 CO CO





*SPR LEN (Spring Length)
is defined as the distance between the centrelines of


the front and rear hangers
for a spring.





#HANG WID is the lateral
distance between spring hangers.





4.3 Stock Curb Weights (lbs)


----------------------------


SERIES ENGINE B 3B
15B-FT F 2F 1FZE 1HD-FT


25
3142


40 HT
3470 3792


40 ST
3265


80
4760


MEGA
6284





5.0 Engines


===========





5.1 Gas Engines


---------------


Gas Land Cruiser engines
are manufactured by Toyota.


The F and 2F engines were
also used in Toyota Forklifts.


The F engine is supposed
to be based on the Chevy 225 I-6 "Cast Iron Wonder"


and some of the bottom end
along with the water pump and several other


components are supposed to
be interchangeable.


The main differences
between the F and the 2F are the 2F's larger bore,


the F's 2 compression and
2 oil rings versus the 2F's 2 compression and single


oil ring and the fact that
the F had two oil paths--through the filter or


through the engine
compared to the 2F where all oil had to travel through the


filter before the engine.





5.2 Diesel Engines


------------------


Most of the diesels are
made by Hino industries, a sub-contractor for Toyota.


Similar engines were used
in Hino heavy trucks which are used in Canada, so


the drivetrain of Hino
trucks may be adaptable. Hino engines similar to the B


and 3B are supposed to be
used to run the refrigerator units on some


refrigerated semi
trailers. Some of the B and 3B diesels are manufactured by


Daihatsu and can be
identified by the letter "D" on the timing cover.





Most diesels in Japan and
Canada are 24V and therefore meet NATO


military specs. However,
Canadian 1985 (85/10) BJ70's and all Canadian


BJ60's are 12V. In
Europe, all diesels before 1984 and all diesels larger


than 4 cylinders after
1984 are 24V except for in the 80 series which uses


a 24/12V Series/Parallel
switch to allow 24V starting and 12V while running.


Australian diesels are all
12V.





The B, H, and 2H were also
used in Toyota Forklifts, Dyna and Coaster buses.





5.3 Other Engine Suppliers


--------------------------


Portugese BJ73's use a VM
engine made by the Italian company Stabilimenti


Meccanici VM S.p.A. South
African HJ75's use an Atlantis Diesel Engine licensed


from Perkins. The
Brazilian made Bandeirantes used a Mercedes diesel engine.





5.4 Engine Specifications


-------------------------


Legend


FUEL


ID - Indirect
Injection Diesel


DD - Direct Injection
Diesel


EID - Electronically
Indirect Injection Diesel


T - Turbo


EFIG - Gas Electronic
Fuel Injection





DISP
TORQUE BORExSTROKE COMP


MODEL (CC) CYL FUEL
HP@RPM FT-LB@RPM VALVES (mm) (mm) RATIO


B (GAS) 3386 6 G
85@3600 159@???? 12 OHV 84x102 6.4:1





B 2977 4 ID
80@3600 141@2200 8 OHV 95x105 21:1


2B 3168 4 ID
93@3600? 159@2200 8 OHV 98x105 21:1


3B 3431 4 ID
90@3500 159@2200 8 OHV 102x105 20:1


13B-T 3431 4 TDD
120@3400 210@2000 8 OHV 102x105 17.6:1


14B 3661 4 DD
96@3400 177@2200 8 OHV 102x112 18.0:1


15B-FT 4104 4 TDD
155@3200 288@1800 16 OHV





F (-60) 3878 6 G
105@3200 189@2000 12 OHV 90x102 6.8:1


F (60-) 3878 6 G
125@3600 209@2000 12 OHV 90x102 7.5:1


2F 4230 6 G
135@3600 210@1800 12 OHV 94x102 7.8:1


3F 3955 6 G
155@4000 219@3000 12 OHV 94x95


3F-EFI 3955 6 EFIG
155@4200 220@2200 12 OHV 94x95 8.1:1





1FZ-??? 4477 6 G
138@???? Low compression engine for low grade fuel


1FZ-F 4477 6 G
190@4400 268@2800 24DOHC 100x95 9.0:1


1FZ-FE 4477 6 EFIG
212@4600 275@3000 24DOHC 100x95 9.0:1





H 3576 6 ID
90@3600 151@2200 12 OHV 88x98 21.0:1


H 3576 6 ID
95@3600 159@2200 12 OHV 88x98 19.5:1


2H 3980 6 ID
103@3500 177@2000 12 OHV 91x102 20.7:1


12H-T 3980 6 TDD
135@3500 231@2000 12 OHV 91x102 18.6:1





1HD-T 4163 6 TDD
165@3600 268@2000 12SOHC 94x100 18.6:1


1HD-FT 4163 6 TDD
168@3600 280@2500 24SOHC 94x100 18.6:1


1HZ 4163 6 ID
135@4000 187@2200 12SOHC 94x100 22.7:1





1KZ-T 2982 4 TID
125@3600 218@2000 8 96x103 21.2:1


1KZ-TE 2982 4 EID
130@3600 213@2000 8 96x103 21.2:1




2L 2446 4 ID
72@4000 115@2200 8SOHC 92x92 22.3:1


2L-T 2446 4 TID
86@4000 139@2400 8SOHC 92x92 20.0:1


2L-TII 2446 4 TID
90@4000 159@2400 8SOHC 92x92 21.0:1





1PZ 3469 5 ID
115@4000 170@2600 10SOHC 94x100 22.7:1





22R 2367 4 G
105@4800 136@2800 8SOHC 92x89 9.0:1


22R-E 2367 4 EFIG
114@4600 192@3400 8SOHC 92x89 9.0:1





OTHER


STABILIMENTI MECCANICI
VM (ITALY)


VM66A 2494 5 ID
108@4200 220@1600 10 OHC 88x92 22.0:1





ATLANTIS DIESEL (SOUTH
AFRICA)


ADE236 3860 DD
80@2800 220@1400 8 OHV 98x127 16.0:1





MERCEDES BENZ
(BRAZILIAN BANDEIRANTE)


OM314 3784 DD
85@2800 235@1800 8 OHV 97x128 17.0:1


OM364 3972 DD
90@2800 235@1800 8 OHV 98x133 17.3:1





5.5 Availability (Model Year)


-----------------------------


SERIES AUS CANADA
U.S. JAPAN


B 78-80 NA
74-80


2B
80-82


3B 81-90 81-87 NA
81-90


13B-T ??-90 NA NA
84-90





F 58?-74 58?-74
55-74


2F 75-84 75-87
74-87


3F 84-92 NA NA


3F-EFI 88-92 88-92
88-92





1FZ-FE 93- 93-
93-





2H 81-90 85-87 NA
80-90


12H-T 86-90 NA NA
86-90





1HD-T 90-95 NA NA
91-


1HD-FT 95-


1HZ 90- 95-+ NA
91-





2L 81-84
81-83 83-87


2L-T 86-93 84-85*
84-85* 84-87


2L-T-II





1PZ 90-93 ??91-+





22R 84-92 81-88#
81-88#





*In Toyota Diesel Pickups


#In Toyota Pickups


+Industrial Use Only





6.0 ENGINE/CHASSIS COMBINATIONS
(PRODUCTION YEAR)


=================================================


B(GAS) F


10 ..... .....


BJ 51-53 .....


25 54-59 55-59


28 ..... 58-59


V ..... 58-59


35 ..... 56-59








B 2B 3B
13B-T 14B F 2F H 2H


40 74-78 ..... .....
..... ..... 60-74 74-84 ..... .....


V 74-78 ..... .....
..... ..... 61-74 74-84 ..... .....


41 ..... 79-81 .....
..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....


42 ..... ..... 81-84
..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....


43 74-81 ..... 81-84
..... ..... 60-74 74-84 ..... .....


44 ..... 79-81 .....
..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....


V ..... 80-81 .....
..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....


45 C ..... ..... 81-84
..... ..... 61-74 74-86 72-80 .....


45 L ..... ..... 81-84
..... ..... 61-74 74-85 72-80 .....


S ..... ..... .....
..... ..... 61-74 74-85 ..... .....


W ..... ..... .....
..... ..... 60-68 ..... ..... .....


46 ..... ..... .....
..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....


47 L ..... ..... .....
..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 80-85


47 C ..... ..... .....
..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 80-84


50 B ..... ..... .....
..... 96- ..... ..... ..... .....


55 W ..... 79-80 .....
..... ..... 67-74 74-79 ..... .....


56 W ..... ..... .....
..... ..... ..... 74-79 ..... .....


B ..... ..... .....
..... 96- ..... ..... ..... .....





3B 13B-T 2F
3F-EFI 2H 12H-T


60 81-89 ..... 80-84
..... 81-89 .....


61 ..... ..... .....
..... ..... 86-89


62 ..... ..... .....
85-89 85-89 .....





3B 13B-T 15B-T 2F
3F-EFI 1FZ-FE 2H 12H-T 1HD-T 1HD-FT 1HZ 1PZ


70 84-89 ..... .....
84-85 85-92 93- ..... ..... 90- ...... 93- 90-


71 ..... 87-89 .....
..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ...... 93- ...


72 ..... ..... .....
..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ...... .... ...


73 84-89 ..... .....
84-85 85-93 93- ..... ..... 90- ...... 93- 90-


74 ..... 87-89 .....
..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ...... .... ...


75 84-89 ..... .....
..... 85-92 93- 85-89 ..... 90- ...... .... 90-


77 ..... ..... .....
..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 90- ...... 93- 90-


78 ..... ..... .....
..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ...... 93- ...


80 ..... ..... .....
..... 90-92 93- ..... ..... 90- 95- 90- ...


MEGA ..... ..... 95-
..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ...... .... ...





2L 2L-T 2L-T-II
1KZ-T 1KZ-TE 22R 22R-E


70 LD 84-86 86-90 90-
..... ..... 84-88 88-


71 LD ..... ..... 91-93
..... ..... 84-88 ...


72 LD ..... 86-90 90-93
..... ..... ..... ...


73 LD ..... 88-90 90-
..... ..... ..... 88-


77 LD 90-93 ..... .....
..... ..... ..... ...


78 LD ..... ..... 91-93
..... ..... ..... ...


78 LD ..... ..... .....
..... 93-96





6.1 Selected Country Engine/Chassis
Sales Figures (Model Year)





CANADA


Mod
------------------------------------------------------------


Yr BJ40 BJ42 BJ60 BJ70
FJ40 FJ45 FJ55 FJ62 HJ60M HJ60P


76
946 181


77
1204 471 175


78 160
1204 342 260


79 279
130


80 173 173
222 45 30


81 765 451


82 451 791


83 167 614


84 234 716


85 460 388


86 137
305 215


87 139
309 188


88
444


89
120





7.0 Performance/Fuel Economy


============================


0-100km/h
Fuel Ecomomy (l/100km)


BJ40 4SPD 4.11 diff
29.9s 13.0


BJ42 4SPD 4.11 diff
24.4s 13.7


FJ40 4SPD 3.70 diff
18.7s 18.6


FJ60 4SPD 3.70 diff
16.3s 17.4


HJ60 4SPD 3.70 diff
22.7s 12.5


MEGA AUTO
25.3MPG@37MPH





8.0 Transmissions & Transfer
Cases


==================================


The H4X transmissions used
with the gas engies use a 275mm clutch and have an


output shaft that is
1-1/16" in diameter and has 10 splines. H41


transmissions were never
offered on US model Cruisers but may have been


available in some Canadian
45 series pickups. The transmissions for B diesels


use a 1-1/2" longer
input shaft with different splines and will not mate to


either an F or H series
engine.





When the four speed was
introduced in 1974, the transfer case ratio was


raised and new helical cut
gears were used that were wider and quieter


than the earlier model.
Until 1981, parking brake was mounted on the


driveline after the
transfer cases. In 1981, the new split-case


transfer case was
introduced. It featured a stronger idler shaft and


the parking brake was
moved to become part of the rear drum brakes.





8.1 Transmission & Transfer Case
Ratios (All :1)


------------------------------------------------


MODEL ENGINE DATES
SPDS 1ST 2ND 3RD 4TH 5TH R TFR LW TFR


?FJ25? F 4
5.41 3.12 1.77 1.000 5.44 NONE SPLINES


BJ B 52 4
5.53 3.48 1.71 1.000 5.60 NONE


?B-85? B(GAS) 4
5.299 2.843 1.634 1.000 5.299


J30 F 69-75 3
2.757 1.691 1.000 3.676 2.313 10


H41 F 4
4.925 2.643 1.519 1.000 4.925 1.992 16


H42 F,B 73-75 4
3.555 2.292 1.410 1.000 4.271 1.992 16


75-80 4
3.555 2.292 1.410 1.000 4.271 1.959 16


81-89 4
3.555 2.292 1.410 1.000 4.271 2.276 19


H4?? F,B,H 81- 4
4.843 2.619 1.516 1.000 4.843 1.963 19


H55F F,B,H,HZ 83- 5
4.843 2.619 1.516 1.000 0.845 4.843 1.959 19 NOT USA


H5?? B 5
4.925 2.643 1.519 1.000 0.859 4.925 1.992 16


H150F HZ 5
4.529 2.464 1.490 1.000 0.881 4.313 2.488


H151F 3F,FZ,HD 5
4.081 2.294 1.490 1.000 0.881 4.313 2.488


R151F PZ,KZ 90- 4
4.313 2.330 1.436 1.000 4.220 1.963 19


A440F F -90 4
2.950 1.530 1.000 0.717 2.678 2.296


A440F F 90-91 4
2.950 1.530 1.000 0.717 2.678 2.488


A442F FZ,HD 4
2.950 1.530 1.000 0.765 2.678 2.488


A???? 15F-T 4
3.018 1.548 1.000 0.765 2.678 2.488


G40 L,2L,R,1PZ 4
3.928 2.333 1.451 1.00 4.743 21


G52F L, 2L,R 5
3.928 2.333 1.451 1.000 0.851 4.743 2.276 23


150R 2L-T 5
4.313 2.330 1.436 1.000 0.838 4.220 2.295


???? 2L-T, 1KZ-T 5
3.830 2.062 1.436 1.000 0.838 4.220 2.296


???? 1KZ-T, 1KZ-TE 5
3.830 2.062 1.436 1.000 0.838 4.220 1.959





9.0 Axles


=========


Regular Land Cruiser axle
housings are similar to a Ford 9" and differential


carriers are similar in
construction to a Chevy 12bolt. The front and rear


differential housings are
both offset to the right in all models except some


'58-62's which were
centred. They have an 9.5" ring gear. The axle shafts


are 33mm in diameter (the
same as a some Dana 60's) 1960-67 shafts had


10 coarse splines while 68
and later shafts have 30 fine splines. In


1968, the front axle CV
joints changed from ball joints to Birfield.


Full Floating Axles have
smaller shafts because the entire weight of the


truck is bourne by the
wheel bearings and the shaft itself is not loaded


in flexure.





Light Duty axle housings
are the same as those used in Toyota Pickup trucks.


They feature a smaller
housing constructed similarly to the heavy duty Land


Cruiser. The ring gear is
only 8" but the axle shafts are the same size and


have the same number of
splines as the regular Land Cruiser.





All Land Cruisers produced
after 1991 use a reverse-cut 8" ring gear in the


front and the 9.5"
ring gear in the rear.





60/2 Series axles are 70mm
wider than 40 series


70 Series axles are 20mm
wider than 40 series





9.1 AXLE CODES


--------------





Axle codes are never
located on the axle housings themselves. In trucks


manufacturered after 1976,
the axle codes are located on the build plate


which can be found inside
the engine compartment. The pinion (and sometimes


the ring gear have the
tooth counts (from which the ratio can be calculated)


stamped into them.





Example: K 08 2


^ ^^ ^-2 spider
gears


| ++---4.11
ring/pinion ratio


+------9.5"
ring gear





First digit: ring gear
size


G 8"


J 9.25"


K 9.5"





Second, third digits:
ring/pinion gear ratio


(These numbers apply to
ALL Toyota vehicles--known Land Cruiser ratios are


indicated)





01 3.30


02 3.36


03 3.545


04 3.556


05 3.70 HD Cruiser,
Aftermarket HD Cruiser


06 3.889


07 3.90 HD Cruiser


08 4.111 HD Cruiser,
Aftermarket HD Cruiser


09 4.222


10 4.375


11 4.444


12 4.625


13 4.79


14 4.875


15 5.125


16 5.286


17 5.60


18 5.714


19 5.833


20 6.167


21 6.667


22 6.78


23 6.833


24 7.64


25 4.556 LD Cruiser,
Aftermarket HD Cruiser


26 5.571


27 3.364


28 4.30 LD Cruiser


29 4.10


30 3.727


31 3.909


32 6.591 or 5.583


33 7.503 or 5.583


34 6.781 or 4.786


35 7.636 or 5.60


36 4.778


37 3.583


38 3.417


4.88 Aftermarket HD
Cruiser





Fourth digit: no of
spiders, ltd slip/locker





Code spiders


2 2 open


3 2 LS


4 4 Locking
Diff


5 4 LS





10.0 Production Codes


=====================





The production code of a
Land Cruiser breaks down as follows:





aJnna[a-aa...]





The numbers/letters
preceding the dash describe the body/frame style.





The first digit indicates
the motor series (B/F/H/...)





The "J"
indicates the vehicle came from the "J" production line





the 3rd and 4th digits are
numeric and indicate the series (25/40/60/...)





The 6th digit (if present)
indicates steering position:


L Left Hand
Drive


R/<missing> Right
Hand Drive





The 7th digit (if present)
indicates body type:


V Hardtop


G Luxury
model/wagon


P Pickup


<missing> Soft
top





The letters after the dash
indicate options etc:





Transmission type


<missing> 3SPD


K 4SPD


M 5SPD


P 4SPD AUTO





Rear Door Type


<missing>
Tailgate


C Swingout
(Ambulance)


N Lift-up
Tailgate (Wagons Only)





Grade/Trim Level


E VX


N GX/LX


R Standard





Aspiration


S Standard


E EFI


X Turbocharged





The last letter usually
indicates the intended market:





W Europe


Q Australia


Y Japan


K Canada


A North America


V Middle East





If the vehicle was
delivered incomplete (usually as a cab and chassis) it


received the final
designation of 3.








ABBREVIATIONS USED


ARL Australia


CAN Canada


FIN Finland (Potentially
holds true for all of Europe)


GEN General Export


JAP Japan


ME Middle East


NA North America


USA ? :)





5F 5 Speed Manual


4F 4 Speed Manual


4FC 4 Speed Automatic


IV Incomplete Vehicle
(Usually Cab/Chassis Only)


SOB Swing Out Back Door


LUB Lift Up Back Door


RB Roll Bar


PU Pickup


FRP Removable Fiberglass
Top


ST Soft Top


SRF Low Roof


HRF High Roof





CODE ENG
PRODUCTION NOTES


BJ40


LV-KCJK B
3/78-7/80 CAN 4F SOB RB


LV-KCW B
7/75-12/80 FIN 4F SOB RB





BJ42


LV-KCJK 3B
8/80-10/82 CAN 4F SOB RB


LV-KCW 3B
10/80-12/82 FIN 4F SOB RB


LV-MCJK 3B
10/82-10/84 CAN 5F SOB RB


LV-MCW 3B
1/80-11/85 FIN 5F SOB RB


RV-KCQ 3B
8/80-10/82 ARL 4F SOB RB


RV-MCQ 3B
10/82-10/84 ARL 5F SOB





BJ45


LV-KCW 3B
10/80-8/85 FIN 4F TROOP


LP-KW 3B
10/80-11/85 FIN 4F PIC





BJ60


LV-KK 3B
8/80-10/81 CAN 4F


LG-KK 3B
10/81-10/82 CAN 4F


LG-MK 3B
10/82-10/85 CAN 5F





BJ70


L-KR 3B
11/84-8/88 GEN 4F ST


LV-KN 3B
8/86-8/88 GEN 4F HT LX


LV-KR 3B
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F HT


LV-MN 3B
8/86-1/90 GEN 5F HT LX


LV-MR 3B
11/84-1/90 GEN 5F HT


LV-MRK 3B
11/84-8/86 CAN 5F HT LX 12V


LV-MNK 3B
8/86-7/87 CAN 5F HT LX


R-KR 3B
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F ST


RV-KR 3B
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F HT


RV-MR 3B
11/84-8/88 GEN 5F HT


RV-MRQ 3B
11/84-1/90 ARL 5F HT





BJ73


LV-MN 3B
8/86-1/90 GEN 5F HT LX


R-KR 3B
8/86-1/90 GEN 4F ST


RV-MRQ 3B
11/84-8/86 ARL 5F FRP


RV-MNQ 3B
8/86-1/90 ARL 5F FRP LX





BJ74


V-PNX 13BT
10/85-1/90 JAP 4FC FRP


RV-PRXQ 13BT
10/85-8/86 ARL 4FC HT


RV-MNXQ 13BT
8/86-1/90 ARL 5F HT L


RV-MRXQ 13BT
10/85-8/86 ARL 5F HT


RV-PNXQ 13BT
8/86-1/90 ARL 4FC HT LX


RV-PEXQ 13BT
8/86-8/88 ARL 4FC HT VX





BJ75


LP-KR 3B
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F PIC


LP-MRV 3B
8/87-1/90 ME 5F PIC


LV-MRW 3B
5/85-12/89 FIN 5F TROOP


LV-MRP 3B
5/85-1/90 FIN 5F PIC


LV-KR 3B
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F TROOP


RP-KR 3B
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F PIC


RP-KR3 3B
11/84-8/86 GEN 4F PIC IV


PR-MR3 3B
11/84-1/90 GEN 5F PIC IV


RV-KR 3B
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F TROOP





FJ40


L-A F
3/69-1/75 NA ST


LV F
1/68-1/75 FIN HT


LV-A F
3/69-1/75 NA HT LUB


LV-AC F
4/72-1/75 NA HT SOB


LV-KCW 2F
10/75-5/79 FIN HT RB


L-KJA 2F
1/75-2/76 NA ST RB


L-KJA 2F
2/76-7/80 USA 4F ST RB


L-KJA 2F
8/80-10/81 USA 4F ST RB


LV-KCJA 2F
1/75-2/76 NA 4F HT SOB


LV-KCJA 2F
2/76-7/80 NA 4F HT SOB RB


LV-KCJA 2F
8/80-9/83 USA 4F SOB RB


LV-KJA 2F
2/76-7/80 NA 4F HT


LV-KCJK 2F
2/76-7/80 CAN 4F HT SOB RB


LV-KCJK 2F
8/80-10/81 CAN 4F HT SOB RB


LV-KJK 2F
2/76-9/77 CAN 4F ST


KJA 2F
8/80-11/81 NA


LV-KCJA 2F
8/80-9/83 NA


LV-KCJK 2F
8/80-10/81 CAN


R-KJC 2F
8/80-10/82 ARL 4F ST


R-MJQ 2F
10/82-10/84 ARL 5F ST


RV-KQ 2F
8/80-10/82 ARL 4F LUB


RV-KCQ 2F
8/80-10/82 ARL 4F SOB


RV-MCQ 2F
10/82-10/84 ARL 5F SOB


RV-KCQ 2F
8/80-10/84 ARL 4F TROOP SOB





FJ45


LP-KK 2F
6/76-7/80 CAN 4F PU


LP-B F 3/69


R-KJQ 2F
8/80-10/82 ARL 4F PU ST


RP-KQ 2F
8/80-10/84 ARL 4F PU


RP-KQ3 2F
8/80-10/82 ARL 4F PU IV





FJ55


LG F
3/69-1/75 NA


LG-KA 2F
1/75-2/76 NA 4F


LG-KA 2F
2/76-7/80 USA 4F


LG-KK 2F
2/76-7/80 CAN 4F


LV-B F
5/68-1/75 FIN


LV-KCW 2F
10/75-12/80 FIN 4F





FJ60


LV-KK 2F
8/80-10/81 CAN 4F


LG-KA 2F
8/80-8/87 NA 4F 'G'


LV-KA 2F
9/86-8/87 USA 4F


RG-KQ 2F
8/80-10/82 ARL 4F SRF LUB 'G'


RG-MQ 2F
10/82-11/84 ARL 5F SRF LUB 'G'


RG-MZQ 2F
5/83-11/84 ARL 5F HRF LUB 'G'


RV-KCQ 2F
8/80-10/82 ARL 4F SRF SOB


RV-MCQ 2F
10/82-11/84 ARL 5F SRF SOB





FJ62


LV-PNEA 3F-E
8/87-8/88 USA 4FC


LG-PNEA 3F-E
8/87-1/90 USA 4FC 'G'


LG-PNEK 3F-E
8/87-1/90 CAN 4FC 'G'


RG-MQ 3F
11/84-8/87 ARL 5F SRF LUB 'G'


RG-MZQ 3F
11/84-8/87 ARL 5F HRF LUB 'G'


RG-PQ 3F
11/84-8/87 ARL 4FC SRF LUB 'G'


RG-PZQ 3F
11/84-8/87 ARL 4FC HRF LUB 'G'


RG-MRCQ 3F
8/87-1/90 ARL 5F SRF SOB


RG-MNQ 3F
8/87-1/90 ARL 5F SRF LUB 'G'


RG-PNQ 3F
8/87-1/90 ARL 4FC SRF LUB 'G'


RG-MNZQ 3F
8/87-8/88 ARL 5F HRF LUB 'G'


RG-MEZQ 3F
8/88-1/90 ARL 5F HRF LUB VX


RG-PEZQ 3F
8/87-1/90 ARL 4FC HRF LUB VX


RV-MCQ 3F
11/84-8/87 ARL 5F SRF SOB


RV-PCQ 3F
11/84-10/85 ARL 5F SRF SOB





FJ70


L-KR 3F
11/84-8/88 GEN 4F ST


L-MR 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 5F ST


L-MRV 3F
11/84-8/88 ME 5F ST


L-PR 3F
11/84-8/86 GEN 4FC ST


LV-KN 3F
8/86-8/88 GEN 4F HT LX


LV-KR 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F HT


LV-MEV 3F
8/86-1/90 ME 5F HT VX


LV-MN 3F
8/86-1/90 GEN 5F HT LX


LV-MNV 3F
8/86-1/90 ME 5F HT LX


LV-MR 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 5F HT


LV-MRV 3F
11/84-1/90 ME 5F HT


LV-PEV 3F
8/86-8/88 ME 4FC HT VX


LV-PN 3F
8/86-1/90 GEN 4FC HT LX


LV-PNV 3F
8/86-1/90 ME 4FC HT LX


LV-PR 3F
11/84-8/86 GEN 4FC HT


LV-PRV 3F
11/84-8/88 ME 4FC HT


R-KR 3F
11/84-8/86 GEN 4F ST


RV-KR 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F HT


RV-MR 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 5F HT


RV-MRQ 3F
11/84-1/90 ARL 5F HT





FJ73


L-KR 3F
11/84-8/88 GEN 4F ST


L-MR 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 5F ST


L-MRV 3F
11/84-1/90 ME 5F ST


LV-MEV 3F
8/86-1/90 ME 5F FRP VX


LV-MN 3F
8/86-1/90 GEN 5F FRP LX


LV-MNV 3F
8/86-1/90 ME 5F FRP LX


LV-MR 3F
11/84-8/86 GEN 5F FRP


LV-MRV 3F
11/84-8/86 ME 5F FRP


LV-PEV 3F
8/86-8/88 ME 4FC FRP VX


LV-PNV 3F
8/86-1/90 ME 4FC FRP LX


LV-PRV 3F
11/84-8/86 ME 4FC FRP


RV-MRQ 3F
11/84-8/86 ARL 5F FRP


RV-PRQ 3F
10/85-8/86 ARL 4FC FRP


RV-MNQ 3F
8/86-1/90 ARL 5F FRP LX


RV-MNQ 3F
1/90-8/91 ARL 5F FRP LX


RV-PNQ 3F
8/86-1/90 ARL 4FC FRP LX


RV-MEQ 3F
8/86-8/88 ARL 5F FRP VX


RV-PEQ 3F
8/86-1/90 ARL 4FC FRP VX





FJ75


LP-MNV 3F
8/86-1/90 ME 5F PIC LX


LP-KR 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F PIC


LP-KR3 3F
11/84-8/86 GEN 4F IV


LP-MR 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 5F PIC


LP-MRV 3F
11/84-1/90 ME 5F PIC


LP-MR3 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 5F IV


LV-KR 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F HT TROOP


LV-MR 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 5F HT TROOP


LV-MRV 3F
11/84-1/90 ME 5F HT TROOP


RP-KR 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F PIC


RP-KR3 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F IV


RP-MR 3F
11/84-10/85 GEN 5F PIC


RP-MR3 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 5F IV


RP-MRN 3F
10/85-1/90 SA 5F PIC


RV-KR 3F
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F HT TROOP


RV-MRQ 3F
11/84-1/90 ARL 5F HT TROOP


RV-MRQ 3F
1/90-8/92 ARL 5F HT TROOP


RP-MRQ3 3F
11/84-1/90 ARL 5F IV


RP-MRQ3 3F
1/90-8/92 ARL 5F IV


RV-MRKQ 1FZ-FE
8/92-1/90 ARL 5F HT TROOP


RP-MRKQ3 1FZ-FE
8/92-1/90 ARL 5F IV





FJ80


L-GNPNEA 3F-E
1/90-8/92 NA 4FC


R-GCMRSQ 3F
1/90-8/92 ARL 5F SOB


R-GNMNSQ 3F
1/90-8/92 ARL 5F LUB GXL


R-GNPNEQ 3F-E
1/90-8/92 ARL 4FC LUB GXL


R-GNPEEQ 3F-E
1/90-8/92 ARL 4FC LUB VX





FZJ80


L-GNPEKA 1FZ-FE
8/92-1/90 NA 4FC


R-GCMRKQ 1FZ-FE
8/92-1/95 ARL 5F SOB


R-GNMNKQ 1FZ-FE 8/92-
ARL 5F LUB GXL


R-GNPNKQ 1FZ-FE 8/92-
ARL 4FC LUB GXL


R-GNPEKQ 1FZ-FE 8/92-
ARL 4FC LUB VX





HJ45


LP-KW H
1/79-12/80 FIN 4F PIC





HJ47


RV-KCQ 2H
8/80-10/84 ARL 4F TROOP SOB


RP-KQ 2H
8/80-10/84 ARL 4F PIC


RP-KQ3 2H
8/80-10/84 ARL 4F PIC IV





HJ60


LG-KW 2H
11/80-11/85 FIN 4F


LG-MNW 2H
11/87-2/90 FIN 5F SRF LUB


LG-MNZW 2H
11/87-11/89 FIN 5F HRF LUB


LG-MK 2H
10/85-8/87 CAN 5F


LG-MW 2H
2/83-11/87 FIN 5F


LG-MZW 2H
4/84-11/87 FIN 5F HRF LUB


LG-PK 2H
10/85-8/87 CAN 4FC


RG-KQ 2H
8/80-10/82 ARL 4F SRF LUB 'G'


RG-MQ 2H
10/82-8/87 ARL 5F SRF LUB 'G'


RG-MNQ 2H
8/87-1/90 ARL 5F SRF LUB 'G'


RG-MRCQ 2H
8/87-1/90 ARL 5F SRF SOB


RG-MZQ 2H
5/83-10/85 ARL 5F HRF LUB 'G'


RG-PQ 2H
11/84-10/85 ARL 4FC SRF LUB 'G'


RG-PZQ 2H
11/84-8/87 ARL 4FC HRF LUB 'G'


RV-KCQ 2H
8/80-10/82 ARL 4F SRF SOB


RV-MCQ 2H
10/82-8/87 ARL 5F SRF SOB


RV-PCQ 2H
11/84-10/85 ARL 4FC SRF SOB





HJ61


LG-MXW 12HT
5/86-11/87 FIN 5F LUB 'G'


LG-MNXW 12HT
11/87-1/90 FIN 5F LUB 'G' (Special series 2/89-1/90)


RG-MXQ 12HT
10/85-8/87 ARL 5F SRF LUB 'G'


RG-MZXQ 12HT
10/85-8/87 ARL 5F HRF LUB 'G'


RG-PXQ 12HT
10/85-8/87 ARL 4FC SRF LUB 'G'


RG-PZXQ 12HT
10/85-8/87 ARL 4FC HRF LUB 'G'


RG-MNXQ 12HT
8/87-1/90 ARL 5F SRF LUB 'G'


RG-PNXQ 12HT
8/87-1/90 ARL 4FC SRF LUB 'G'


RG-MNZXQ 12HT
8/87-8/88 ARL 5F HRF LUB 'G'


RG-MEZXQ 12HT
8/88-1/90 ARL 5F HRF LUB VX


RG-PEZXQ 12HT
8/87-1/90 ARL 4FC HRF LUB VX





HJ75


LP-KR 2H
11/85-1/90 GEN 4F PIC


LP-MR 2H
10/85-1/90 GEN 5F PIC


LV-KP 2H
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F HT TROOP


RP-KR 2H
11/94-1/90 GEN 4F PIC


RP-KR3 2H
11/94-1/90 GEN 4F IV


RP-MR 2H
11/84-10/85 GEN 5F PIC


RV-KR 2H
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F HT TROOP


RP-MRQ 2H
11/84-1/90 ARL 5F PIC


RP-MRN AD
10/85-1/90 SA 5F PIC (Atlantis Diesel Engine)


RV-MRQ 2H
11/84-1/90 ARL 5F HT TROOP


RP-MRQ3 2H
11/84-1/90 ARL 5F PIC IV





HDJ80


R-GNMNXQ 1HDT
1/90-1/95 ARL 5F LUB GXL


R-GNPNXQ 1HDT
1/90-1/95 ARL 4FC LUB GXL


R-GNMEXQ 1HDT
1/90-1/95 ARL 5F LUB VX


R-GNPEXQ 1HDT
1/90-1/95 ARL 4FC LUB VX


R-GNMNWQ 1HDFT 1/95-
ARL 5F LUB GXL


R-GNPNWQ 1HDFT 1/95-
ARL 4FC LUB GXL


R-GNPEWQ 1HDFT 1/95-
ARL 4FC LUB VX





HZJ70


RV-MRQ 1HZ
1/90-1/95 ARL 5F HT


V-MNS 1HZ 1/95-
JAP 5F ? LX


V-MNU 1HZ 1/95-
JAP 5F ? LX





HZJ73


RV-MNQ 1HZ
1/90-8/91 ARL 5F HT LX


RV-PNQ 1HZ
1/90-8/91 ARL 4FC HT LX





HZJ75


RP-MRQ 1HZ 1/90-
ARL 5F IV


RP-MRQ3 1HZ 1/90-
ARL 5F IV





HZJ80


R-GCMRSQ 1HZ 1/90-
ARL 5F SOB


R-GNMNSQ 1HZ 1/90-
ARL 5F LUB GXL





LJ70


L-KR 2L
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F ST


LV-KN 2L
8/86-8/88 GEN 4F HT LX


LV-KR 2L
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F HT


LV-MR 2L
11/84-1/90 GEN 5F HT


LV-MNX 2LT
8/86-1/90 GEN 5F HT LX


LV-MRX 2LT
10/85-8/86 GEN 5F HT


LV-MRXW 2LT
9/86-11/86 FIN 5F HT


LV-MNXW 2LT
11/86-12/92 FIN 5F HT (Special 6/87-11/87, 5/91-12/92)


R-KR 2L
11/84-8/88 GEN 4F ST


RV-KN 2L 8/86-8/88 GEN
4F HT LX


RV-KR 2L 11/84
GEN 4F HT


RV-MR 2L
11/84-10/85 GEN 5F HT


RV-MRX 2LT
10/85-8/86 GEN 5F HT


RV-MRXQ 2LT
10/85-8/86 ARL 5F HT BUNDERA


RV-MNXQ 2LT
8/86-1/90 ARL 5F HT BUNDERA LX


RV-MNXQ 2LT
1/90-8/92 ARL 5F HT BUNDERA LX


RV-MEXQ 2LT
8/86-8/88 ARL 5F HT BUNDERA VX





PZJ70


RV-MRQ 1PZ
1/90-5/93 ARL 4F HT


RV-MNQ 1PZ
1/90-5/93 ARL 5F HT LX


-MRS 1PZ
JAP 5F ST


V-MNS 1PZ
JAP 5F HT LX


V-MRS 1PZ
JAP 5F HT





PZJ77


HV-MNU 1PZ
1/90-1/94 JAP 5F HT LX


V-MRU 1PZ
1/90-1/94 JAP 5F HT


HV-MNS 1PZ
1/90-1/94 JAP 5F HT LX


V-MRS 1PZ
1/90-1/94 JAP 5F HT





RJ70


L-KR 22R
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F ST


L-MR 22R
11/84-8/86 GEN 5F ST


L-MRV 22R
11/84-8/88 ME 5F ST


LV-KR 22R
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F HT


LV-KN 22R
8/86-8/88 GEN 4F HT LX


LV-MN 22R
8/86-1/90 GEN 5F HT


LV-MEV 22R
8/86-8/88 ME 5F HT VX


LV-MNV 22R
8/86-1/90 ME 5F HT LX


LV-MRV 22R
11/84-8/88 ME 4F HT


R-MRQ 22R
11/84-8/88 ARL 5F ST BUNDERA


RV-KR 22R
11/84-1/90 GEN 4F HT


RV-KN 22R
8/86-8/88 GEN 4F HT LX


RV-MRQ 22R
11/84-8/86 ARL 5F HT BUNDERA


RV-MNQ 22R
8/86-1/90 ARL 5F HT BUNDERA LX


RV-MNQ 22R
1/90-8/91 ARL 5F HT BUNDERA LX


RV-MEQ 22R
11/84-8/86 ARL 5F HT BUNDERA VX





11.0 Body Colour Codes


======================





This list is by no means
complete. I don't know the start/end date for most of


the colours. When I
precede a date by a "<" I'm sure of that date, but
believe


the colour was AVAILABLE
BEFORE that date. If I put a "-<" before a date, the


colour was PHASED OUT
BEFORE that date.





CODE COLOUR NAME
YEARS OFFERED


4x
55 6x 7x 80


012 Cygnus White
<71-76 <71-76


033 White
80-


113 Health Grey
<71-<79


155 Dk Charcoal Grey
Irrid. 87


202 Green


309 Freeborn Red
<71-84 <71-79 80-


414 Buffalo Brown
<71-<79


415 Pueblo Brown
<71-<79 <71-<79


416 Dune Beige
<71-80


464 Beige
79-84 80-84


474 Dark Copper
-79


4E9 Beige
85


4G8 Light Beige Irrid.


532 Yellow
<76-<79,82?


611 Dark Green
-<79


621 Rustic Green (Dark)
<71-79


622 Nebula Green
<71-<79 <71-<79


653 Olive Green
<76-82


681 Green (Medium)
81-83


808 Horizontal Blue
<71-<75


822 Royal Blue
<71-<79 <71-<76


854 Blue (sky blue)
<76-80


857 Nordic Blue (Dark)
79-84 80-84


Feel Like Blue


861 Bright Blue Irrid.
81-83


8B4 Night Blue Irrid.
85-


LM11





Two Tone patterns


VEHICLE YEARS
CODE COLOURS USED


FJ55(L)V, V-B 71
C6580 113/012/113


71
C6581 309/012/309


71
C6582 415/012/415


71
C6583 622/012/622


71
C6584 822/012/822


FJ55LG 71
C6591 113/012/113


71
C6592 309/012/309


71
C6593 415/012/415


71
C6594 622/012/622


71
C6595 822/012/822





12.0 Decoding your ID plates


============================


I'll describe the various
ID plate types with their usual location in brackets.


Keep in mind, I've only
seen North American plates so yours may be quite


different. The
extra-descriptive plate with the axle/transmission/colour codes


was not used until 1976.
If your vehicle was sold in North America, there's a


99-44/100% chance that
youre truck's got 4.11 gears and an H42 or J30


transmission anyways.





Pre-1974 ID Plate (FENDER
APRON)


+-----------------------------------------+


|O T O Y O T A
O|


| MODEL FJ40L
|


| ___ ENGINE MODEL
F |


| |tep| NUMBER OF
CYLINDERS 6 |


| ~~~ BORE
3.54 in |


| STROKE
4.00 in |


| PISTON
DISPLACEMENT 237 cu.in |


| NO. FJ40-000000
|


|O TOYOTA MOTOR
CO., LTD. O|


+-----------------------------------------+





1976 FJ55 (FENDER APRON)


+-----------------------------------------+


|O T O Y O T A
O|


| MODEL FJ55LG-KK
|


| ENGINE 2F
4230cc/257.9cu.in |


| FRAME No. FJ55-86909
|


| COLOR/TRIM
|


| TRANS/AXLE
|


| PLANT/G.V.W.
MADE |


| JAPANESE...
IN |


|O tep TOYOTA MOTOR
CO., LTD. JAPAN O|


+-----------------------------------------+





13.0 40 Series Specific Info


============================





13.1 Production Timeline (US/Canada)


------------------------------------


MODEL


YEAR ENG TRANSMISSION
TRANSFER OTHER


1960 F 3-on the tree
2.313:1 Start of prodution



Small round FR turn signals



Single brake master cyl resevoir





1963 3 on the floor
(Option)





1964
Flip-up roof vent removed



Smooth headlight bezel





1965
Larger side windows and corner



windows added





1968
30 fine spline axles replace 10 coarse



splines



Birfield joints replace ball joints in FR



Siamese centre exhaust ports replaced


One
piece manifold gasket added



Cable throttle linkage replaces rod



Padded Dash


Vin
plate on door pillars





1969
"Improved" steering centre arm



Small Rectangular FR turn signals



Replaceable element oil filter replaced



with catridge type (03/69)





1970
Dual resevoir master cyl



Dual horns





1971
Power Brakes (07/70)





1972 3 on the floor
STD Smog pump appears (09/72)



Domed pistons in F become standard (09/72)



Additional wire added from starter to coil



(12/72)





1973
Separate model for Calif introduced (09/73)


EGR
system added (09/73)



Extra gusseting added to spare tire carrier



(03/73)



Additional frost plugs added to block (09/73)



Notched con-rod bearings replace knock pin



(09/73)



Additional oil hole for rocker lubrication



added (09/73)



Head bolts lenthened to 145.5mm (09/73)


Two
ridges added to valves for retainers



(09/73)



Front diff fill plug moved 20mm closer to



centreline of axle (12/73)



Saftey catch added on hood



Ignition switch moved to steering



column



Factory AM radio



Stronger steering box





1974 2F 4 SPD
1.999:1 4 Speed Transmission (8/74)



Larger universal joints & flanges (01/74)



Transfer shift rod notched for driveshaft



clearance (1/74)



Rectangular RR brake lights/turn signals


RR
lower shock bolt moves from axle to U-



bolt bracket



Clutch changed from coil spring type to



diaphragm (08/74)



Clutch slave moved from left to right side



of bellhousing (08/74)



Cover added to timing hole (08/74)


No.
2 cover on bellhousing changed from



steel to rubber (08/74)



Clutch release fork boot modified)



U-joint flange modified for better grease



nipple access (11/74)



Longest production run of any LC (9/73-



12/74)





1975
1.959:1 Thicker side doors



Ambulance doors replace lift/tailgate


LG
Square FR Turn Signals/side markers



Wipers move to bottom of windshield



Muffler moved from between frame



rails to under rear tub



Transfer Case shift lever size increased



(03/75)



Transfer Case gear area increased (Start of



1.959 Case Ratio) (04/75)



Valve seats improved (04/75)





1976
FR disk brakes (9/75)



Larger brifields



Front outer axle shafts changed from 10



coarse splines to 30 fine splines



Front spindles and bearings enlarged



Build plate appears



Transfer bushing diameter decreased (02/76)





1977
Tubular spare tire mount (09/76)



Pop-out rear windows (08/76)





1978 2F,B
Diesel comes to Canada



Fine spline pinion flange (1/78)





1979
3.73:1 Diff becomes standard on FJ


22
gal under-floor fuel tank



Power steering becomes and option


Air
conditioning becomes an option



Reclining Seats



Catalytic converter



Fewer, larger body mounts



Squared off headlight bezel & wider set



headlights



Tail-lights grounded via wire instead of



through housing (1/79)





1981 2F,3B
2.276 3B comes to Canada



Improved 3B exhaust manifold



Larger shackles, hangers & frame gussets



Split case transfer case


New
RR brakes with 11.8" drums and single



self-adjusting wheel cylinder (8/80)



Parking brake moved from rear of TFR to



rear drums



Warn front hubs replaced with stainless



steel Aisin units



Front outer axle shafts shortened



Rear heater moves under center console



"Shield" shaped steering wheel centre



Locking "Pocket"



Chrome window weather stripping replaced



with rubber





1983
4(40)/5SPD(42)1.959 Dash re-designed & includes digital clock





1984
Production CEASES! :(





Although production of the
40 Series Land Cruiser stopped in 1984, there is


still a _COPY_ in
production. It is manufactured in Brazil and is called a


Bandeirante. It features
a body/frame which is a copy of a Land Cruiser and


is powered by a Mercedes
diesel motor.





13.2 More Production Info


--------------------------


These are some known dates
associated with frame and engine numbers. This


should provide some
assistance in determining the vintage of components.





DATE FRAME NO.
ENGINE NO. TRANNY NO. NOTES


04/69 067429
Starting frame for '70


09/70 89034
Starting frame for '71


09/71 113001
Starting frame for '72


08/72 134102
Starting frame for '73 ST


08/72 134627
Starting frame for '73 HT


09/72 140174
F-406511


03/73 144381


05/73
F-434231


09/73 160001
F-510001 Starting frame for '74


11/73
3J-425


12/73 165428


12/73 166077


12/73 166226


01/74 167459


04/74
F-539555


08/74 179420
4spd tranny


08/74 179455
3spd tranny


11/74 185078
4L-1104


12/74 191096
Starting frame for '75


03/75 195335


04/75 198572
2F-917420 5D-2128 Start of 1.959 tfr ratio


05/75 199225


05/75 200074


09/75 207793
Starting frame for '76


01/75 215536


02/76 219424
602-2435


09/76 231077
Starting frame for '77


09/77 256757
Starting frame for '78


01/79 298294


05/81 341000








14.0 55 Series Specific Info


============================





14.1 Production Timeline (US/Canada)
- Kerry Manning (D55guy@engr.colostate.edu)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------





Many of the FJ40
changes also apply





MODEL


YEAR ENG TRANSMISSION
TRANSFER OTHER


1969 F135 3 on tree
2.313:1 FT turn (Amber) mounted on side of



engine cowling (wing style)



Front parking lights (A) mounted in grill



Brake lights (R) and rear turn signals (R)



mounted at belt line



Mini "scoops" mounted on hood





1970
Grill slightly modified



Front turn signal (A) mounted on top of



fender (simple pedestal style)



Front parking lights (A) removed



Mini "scoops" removed







1971
A/C becomes optional! (7/70)



Temperature gauge changed (7/70)





F155
Oil filler moved to valve cover (3/71)


3 on the floor
Rod linkage replaces vacuum shift on t-case



(3/71)



Headlight bezel updated (3/71)



Smaller windshield washer tank (3/71)





1972
Speedometer changed (9/71)



Steering box and associated parts changed



(4/72)





1973
Very minor modification to grill (9/72)



Rear vent added (9/72)


Two
piece license plate light replaces the


one
piece (9/72)



Heater changed with larger front blower vent



(9/72)



Dash changed to fit removable panel for



easier access (9/72)


Key
moved to column (9/72)



Steering wheel changed (9/72)



Speedometer changed (9/72)



Antenna changed (1/73)





1974
Wing window removed (9/73)


Two
piece fender emblem replaced with one-



piece (9/73)



ASCO Hubs become standard (9/73)





2F 4SPD
Oil filter moved to side of block



Aluminum valve cover and water pump



Smaller air cleaner on top of valve cover



Hood changed to accommodate 2F air cleaner




1975
Front running lights (A) removed (12/74)



Front turn signal upgrades to combination



signal (pedestal style) (12/74)



Exhaust system redesigned (1/75)



Optional A/C redesigned (1/75)



Lock added to fuel door (1/75)



Door lock changed so door must be unlocked



to be opened from inside (8/75)





1976
Larger, fine spline Birfields (9/75)



Front disc brakes (9/75)



Greatly improved brake booster (9/75)



Temperature gauge changed (9/75)



Retractable front seat belts (1/76)



Optional A/C redesigned (2/76)







1977
Slight cosmetic modifications to tailgate



(12/76)



"TOYOTA" and "4 WHEEL DRIVE" emblems
added


to
tail gate (12/76)





1978
Combination tail light (9/77)



Combination gauge ammeter upgraded from



warning light to actual gauge (9/77)



Fuel gauge changed (9/77)



Temperature gauge changed (9/77)



Upgraded horn (9/77)





1979
Ring and Pinion ratio changed to 3.70 (1/79)



Speedometer changed (9/79)





1980
The seen mystical legend of the 55 w/ factory p.s.



Production ends





14.2 Frame Number dates


-----------------------


See the FJ40 section for engine
number dates.





DATE FRAME NO. NOTES


04/69 013179
Starting frame for '70


09/70 018461
Starting frame for '71


09/71 024001
Starting frame for '72


08/72 029632
Starting frame for '73


12/72 031360


09/73 037001
Starting frame for '74


11/73 038641


12/73 038844


12/73 038878


01/74 039208


08/74 043288 4spd
tranny


08/74 043293 3spd
tranny


11/74 045017


12/74 046864


12/74 046926
Starting frame for '75


03/75 049008


04/75 049988


05/75 050647
California


06/75 051761


08/75 053910


09/75 054106
Starting frame for '76


02/76 058666


02/76 059587


09/76 065053
Starting frame for '77


09/77 078501
Starting frame for '78


01/79 100328





15.0 60 Series Specific Info


============================





15.1 Production Info


--------------------


DATE FRAME NO.
TRANNY NO.


5/81 013248


5/81 014196


11/86
6J-3857





Aftermarket tailgate lift
struts


NAPA Balkamp Powerlift
819-5565








16.0 80 Series Specific Info


============================





16.1 Full Time 4WD


------------------


All 80 series Cruisers
sold in North America and Europe are full time 4wd. In


Africa and Australia, a
part-time system is still available. 80's produced


between '90-'91 have an
open center differential which is lockable in 4HI and


automatically locked in
4LO. From '92 on, vehicles with ABS had a viscous


coupling that sent a
maximum of 30% torque the non-slipping axle. The


differential is lockable
in 4HI and automatically locked in 4LO.





16.2 Locking Differentials


--------------------------


Locking differentials were
available as options in all 80 series. From 94 on,


they were standard in
Canada. The operation of the lockers is very elegant.


When the differential lock
dial is turned to the "Locked" position, it switches


on a small electrical
servo. The servo pushes on a dog clutch which is meshed


with the splines on the
axle shaft. The dog clutch slides along the axle shaft


and engages on the side of
the differential carrier. The axle is then


completely locked. They
were offered from the procuction date 8/92 onwards.





17.0 Buying/Inspecting a Land
Cruiser


=====================================





NOTE: This article is
biased towards 40 series Land Cruisers, although it can


be applied any model.
Also, parts of this may sound a little like a sermon.


This is because for me
Land Cruiser ownership goes beyond possesing a vehicle


and well into the realm of
the occult. Are YOU willing to sacrifice you life


for your Land Cruiser?





Furthermore, this article
should be required reading for the new Land Cruiser


owner. Running through
the pre-buy checklist will help you find potential


problems in your new
truck, and see what maintenance needs to be done.





So you want to buy a Land
Cruiser. First, some words of warning. If you're looking


at a 40 series, the
vehicle will be at least 11 years old. It was built as an


offroad vehicle and as a
result has probably taken alot more of a beating than a


car of a similar vintage.
It will definitely require more upkeep than a new


vehicle.





With all Land Cruisers,
newer is definitely better. Unlike the Jeeps whose


"quality" varied
widely from year to year until Chysler "neutered" them all
and


Land Rovers where some
Series are shunned because their headlights are in the


wrong place, Toyota was
continually improving the Land Cruiser. Check the


production timelines
earlier in the FAQ to determine which features you can live


without and hence how old
you're willing to go. The only exception to this rule


is if you're living under
a fascist regime such as Kalifornia where ancient


frames are prized for
their smog exempt status.





Usually long before
someone decides to sell a Cruiser, they decide that they


should stop pouring money
into it. Therefore, shortly after you purchase your


truck you can expect to
have to dump a whole lot of money into it to fix little


things the previous owner
couldn't be bothered to do. This can be VERY


discouraging. Don't
worry. Once you get your truck into a roadworthy state, it


will remain there for
quite some time. When I first got my truck, the fuel


gauge didn't work, most of
the knobs were missing, the headlights had a nasty


habit of turning off
instead of switching to high-beam, none of the interior or


signal lights worked, the
u-bolt plates were cracked, the shackle pins were


about to rip out of the
shackle plates, the rear tub was basically gone, along


with the bottom 2" of
the hard top and rear doors.





Older Land Cruisers
(Anything other than a 60 or 80) make lousy daily drivers.


They're loud, they suffer
from a relatively harsh ride and vague-on road


handling, and the gas ones
get lousy fuel economy. Thanks to brick-like


aerodynamics, side-winds
quickly become tail-winds. You don't want to commute


in an FJ40.





Anyways, that said, there
are some requirements that I believe a Land Cruiser


owner should meet. They
need to have a steady income. I bought my Cruiser


while I was in university
and wound up having to take a couple of years off to


work to be able to fix it
up. If you're a starving student, you're probably


better off with a
mini-truck. Parts are cheaper, and there's a whole lot more


of them so they're more
"disposable"





If you've got a
significant other, your relationship has to be up to the


stresses imposed by the
new arrival. It took a long time for my girlfriend to


adjust to being a "Land
Cruiser widow" If a Land Cruiser is brought into a weak


relationship, there's
always the chance you won't get to keep the house--then


you'd be without a garage
to work in.





Actually, a garage is
pretty much required. Lying out in the street is


hazardous and people tend
to walk off with tools they find lying on the


sidewalk.





I also firmly believe that
you should do EVERYTHING on your Cruiser AT LEAST


ONCE. If you have a
professional mechanic attend to all you maintenance, you'll


be out of luck when
something goes wrong miles from the nearest gas station





So you've warned anyone
that cares about you that you'll never see them again,


and their only contact
with you will be standing in the garage yelling at the


underside of your truck.
You're mentally prepared to become the caretaker of a


disappearing breed. Time
to go shopping.





You should start scanning
the local classified ads for a couple of months before


you actually begin to shop
in earnest. That way, you can begin to check out the


local price-structure. In
certain parts of the U.S. and Eastern Canada, you may


only see one Cruiser a
week, if that. Once you learn that the most ancient


truck costs more money
than you have, you're ready to start making calls.





When you finally locate a
truck, it's time to go for a look. The things you


should watch for can be
grouped into several categories.





17.1 Engine


-----------


I'm not a fan of gas truck
engines, so I can't offer too much help here. I've


heard that the intake
manifold tends to crack if the truck has been overheated.





Start by checking for
coolant leaks from the hoses, water pump,


and radiator. Next check
for oil leaks from around the pushrod inspection plate


that the blow-by tube
comes from, the gasket between the oil pan and the block,


and the vaccum pump if so
equipped (diesel)





17.1.1 Diesel Engine


--------------------


When the engine is fired
up, watch how quickly the oil pressure builds. If the


idle is high (the engine
feels smooth instead of causing the whole truck to


shake) There's probably
either a hole in the diaphragm or the vaccum lines that


go to it. Both are
relatively cheap and easy to replace provided you buy


Nippondenso and not Toyota
parts. You can test a diaphragm by pulling off the


top end of the "clear"
vacuum hose that goes to the rearmost nipple on the


injection pump and blowing
into it. If you can build pressure, the diaphragm is


still good.





It is normal for a cold
diesel to blow a little white smoke at start-up. Black


smoke usually means that
the injectors need service, white smoke indicates


under-injection of diesel
(probably due to a perforated diaphragm), and blue smoke


shows that oil heavier
than diesel is burning (Ohh ohh!) When the truck is running,


check for excessive
exhaust coming out of the blow-by tube. If the truck has a


noticable miss as it warms
up, one of the glow plugs is shot. They have to be


replaced as a set. The
amount of blow-by will indicate the amount of wear in


the engine.





17.1.2 Gas Engine


-----------------


Pull the spark plugs and
check them for oil fouling. If they're coated, oil is


getting into the cylinder
past the rings and valve guides.





17.2 Cooling System


-------------------


With the engine COMPLETELY
cold, remove the rad cap and check the coolant level.


If you can' actually see
any coolant in the rad, there's probably a leak. If a


B/H series diesel is
overheated or run with inadequate coolant, the heads are


prone to cracking.
Carefully look at the rad. Usually leaks will show up as


whitish stains. When you
return from a test drive, mist the rad with


water. If all the water
evaporates then the tubes aren't plugged. If there are


areas where the water
evaporates and others where it doesn't [cold spots,


usually vertical sections
of the rad] then the rad needs to be serviced [power


flushed or rodded-out].
You can also check for cold spots by using your hand but


there is often not a lot
of space between the grille and the rad --> and you


could burn your hand. Be
careful.





17.3 Electrical


---------------


In both gas and diesel
Cruisers, check the alternator for excessive play. A


brand new onw is worth a
small fortune. Rebuilt 12V ones are difficult to find


and 24V ones are virtually
impossible. If a diesel alternator with a vacuum


pump on the back shows any
signs of oil leakage, it's probably shot.





If you find that there are
accessories (radio etc. attached to only one battery


of a 24V diesel, you can
expect to replace the battery shortly. Drawing 12V off


one of the battery loads
them unequally leading to undercharging of one and


overcharging of the other.





In 1974 and up 40 series,
a dead bulb, bad ground, or wiring problem in a turn


signal will result in the
indicator light in the dash sticking "on"





In 60 and 70 series the
same type of problem will show up as the indicator light


flashing "double
time"





17.4 Transmission/transfer


--------------------------


Check for leaks in all the
gaskets and seals. Chances are, if a seal is leaking,


the bearing behind it is
shot. Ask the owner what kind of lubricant they're


using. Synthetic gear oil
will often manage to seep past a seal that's good


enough for regular oil.
If a seal is weeping synthetic gear oil, chances are


it's on its way out
anyways.





Check for lateral play in
the output yokes from the transfer case. Movement


intdicates bearings that
are in need of replacement. If the movement is greater


than 1/8" chances are
the gears themselves have been damaged once that occurrs,


the transfer case gets
EXTREMELY expensive to re-build.





If a 40 series has been
lifted more than 2", check to make sure that the notch


in the skid plate the
front drive shaft passes through has been enlarged.


Otherwise, the rearmost
yoke on the front driveshaft will bang on the plate


causing the bearings in
the transfer case to fail.





With the truck parked on a
level surface, take out the transmission fill plug.


If gear oil pours out of
the plug, the seal between the transfer case and


transmission is probably
shot. This is a cheap part, but replacing it pretty


much requires pulling the
transfer and transmission. I also believe that when


this seal goes, it's not a
bad idea to rebuild the transfer anyways. It is


usually the first internal
problem that develops, and rebuilding the case when


it goes ensures that all
the gears will still be in good shape.





A leak from the rear
output flange of the transfer usually results in destroyed


parking brake shoes in
pre-1981 transfer cases.





When test-driving the
truck, feel how smoothly the truck shifts. It is normal


for four and five speed
transmissions to be a little balky when they're cold.


The H55F 5 speed tends to
be worse in this respect. If the transmission is


difficult to shift when
warm, chances are the synchros are shot.





Transmissions/transfer
cases popping out of gear is a desparate cry for a


rebuild. Left for any
length of time, it will lead to severe gear/shift collar


damage.





17.5 Driveshafts


----------------


Check for play in the
universal joints. Although a worn joint is cheap to fix,


if the truck has been
driven with the excessive vibration of a failed joint for


any length of time, the
transfer case and pinion bearings can suffer. Dents in


the shafts can also cause
vibrations and premature failure. Grab the shafts on


either side of the slip
joint and try to rotate each side in the opposite


direction. If there's
movement, or wose yet a "clicking" the slip joint splines


are worn and will need to
be replaced. Check that the univeral joints and slip-


joints have been greased,
but NOT just prior to your arrival. (There should be


SOME dirt stuck to any
traces of grease on the zerk-fittings or around the


joints)





Grab the driveshaft on
either side of the slip joint and try to rotate the two


halves relative to each
other. Any movement indicates that the splines in the


slip joint are shot and
either the driveshaft must be cut and the splines


replaced, or the whole
driveshaft must be replaced.





17.6 Rear Axle


--------------


Check the pinion flange
for excessive play. Usually slop here will result in an


a destroyed ring and
pinion.





While inspecting the
brakes, check for any signs of gear oil on the backing


plates or brake shoes.
Gear oil that has leaked past the seal at the outboard


end of the axle tube will
saturate the brake shoes and destroy them.





It is rare for a Cruiser
to experience wheel bearing failure unless they've


REALLY been abused.





17.7 Front axle


---------------


The above rules for
checking the pinion bearings apply along with some potential


problems for the steering
knuckles. Check that there is a thin coating of


grease covering the
knuckle balls from top to bottom. Accumulations of crud on


the knuckle balls can
indicate one of two things. Grease indicates that the


knuckle seals are shot.
Gear oil indicates that the seal inside the axle tube.


Either problem requires
complete disassembly of the knuckles. If the balls are


dry, they've been run
improperly lubricated for quite a while and at least the


upper knuckle bearings
will be destroyed. If the tire can be grabbed by the top


and rocked back and forth,
either the wheel bearing is loose, or the knuckle


bearings are shot. Get
someone else to try and rock the wheel and watch if it's


moving relative to the
knuckle or if the knuckle is moving relative to the axle


tube. Quite often if the
wheel bearings are loose, they are simply in need of


re-packing and adjustment.





17.8 Steering


-------------


In manual steering
equipped Cruisers, check for gear oil in the steering box by


removing the breather vent
located on the top. If there is none, the pitman-arm


seal has failed and the
bearings are probably almost gone. If there is grease


in the steering box, the
seal has failed, and the owner has at least tried to


extend the life of the
steering box. It may be salvagable, but pulling the


pitman arm to replace the
seal will require a very stout puller and possibly a


little heat from an
oxy-acetelyne torch.





Have someone rock the
steering wheel back and forth through a 90 degree arc


while you inxpect the
steering box and centre arm (on 40's-55's) The centre arm


should rotate with no sign
of "wobbling" If the steering tends to "stay where


it's left" while
driving rather than returning to centre, the seller has


probably cranked up the
centre arm to try to hide slop.





Check the ball joints with
a pair of water-pump pliers. Squeeze the ball joint


from the top and bottom
(taking care not to put pressure on grease nipples, if


present) if it
"compresses," it is worn out. Replacing worn tie-rod ends
is


relatively easy, but
ensure that there's only play in the ball joint and not in


the threads between the
rod and the end. This will require replacing the rods


themselves.





17.9 Brakes


-----------


To check the brakes, push
the pedal down and hold it. If the pedal travels


slowly to the floor, there
is a leak in the system. If it is apparent the


system is leaking, start
off by checking at each wheel. Remove each wheel in


turn and check for leaks.
Look for leaks from the callipers on disc brake


equipped vehicles, and
wheel cylinders on drum brake equipped vehicles.





On drum brake vehicles,
put each drum back on and feel how easily it pulls off.


It is usually very
difficult to coerce a drum to come off, but once you've


broken the "seal of
rust," they should only be slightly snug--if they come off


too easily the wheel
cylinders need adjustment. Out-of-adjustment wheel


cylinders will also show
up when you depress the brake pedal in the form of


excessive pedal travel.
Check the shoes for reasonably even wear and thickness


and look for any signs of
scoring in the drums. Try to turn the adjusters on


the wheel cylinders. If
they're seized, they will need replacement. You can


get a rough idea if the
drums are warped or not by putting them back on the


truck and spinning them.
There should be even resistance thought a complete


rotation.





Check all the steel lines
for excessive corrosion or kinks. Flexible lines can


be checked by "kinking"
them back on themselves. If the edge that is in tension


shows signs of cracks, it
needs replacement.





17.10 Suspension


----------------


Many people will replace
the factory suspension anyways, so for them damage here


is of little concern. If
the stock suspension is to be retained, there are a


number of items that
should be checked. Check the spring packs for broken or


bent leaves. If there are
no shoulders on the bushings or the shackle pin doesn't


appear to pass through the
centre of the spring eye/spring hanger the bushings will


need to be replaced.
Check at theres no movement of the shackle pin relative to the


shackle plate. Pre-81
stock shackles are prone to the pins working loose.





Looking at the condition
of the U-bolt ends below the spring plate will give


clues to the use of the
vehicle. If the U-bolt ends are bent/scraped, the truck


has seen some off-road
beating. While looking under the U-bolt plate, ensure


that you can see the nut
and spring pin. The pin will sometimes break in the


middle of the spring pack
causing the bottom chunk to fall out. Replacing the


pin requires
removing/replacing the U-bolts as well.





Check that the shock
mounts on the rear crossmembers and u-bolt plates aren't broken.


Frame/axle mounted broken
pins must be cut out and new ones welded in. On 40 series,


the top front shackle
mount pin will sometimes develop play relative to the shock mount


tower. If that is the
case, it can temporarily be fixed by adding another washer to the


large-nut end of the pin,
but will eventually require proper replacement


which involves
welding/boring out the tower.





17.11 Body


---------


This is probably where
you'll find the greatest variance in Land Crusiers. Some


trucks are pristine and
have been hermetically sealed in their garages all


winter, whereas some have
been used to launch boats in the ocean. The former


will have a body. The
latter won't.





The problem areas for 40
series are: (probable order of occurence)





-along the seam between
the sides of the body and the tops of the fenders in


the rear


-under the back doors


-the "box section"
that runs under the door sills


-the lower edges of all
doors


-on the fenders around the
turn signals


-on the fenders where the
support brackets from the frame attach


-along the sill that runs
down in front of the doors


-the windshield frame
under the rubber gasket


-the lower edge of the
hard top and the steel drain sill under the fibreglass





The problem areas for the
60's and 70's are


-the lip around the fender
wells


-the lower edges of all
the doors


-the rear quarter panels


-under the rubber gasket
around the windshield


-under the mud flaps


-basically any seam around
the rear wheel-wells.


-the seams in the front
footwells





Finding a 60 that has the
dealer-installed aluminum running boards is a good


sign. Intact running
boards indicates that the vehicle had never really been


used offroad and they also
prevent the rocker panels/lower door edges from


being hit by spray from
the tires, decreasing the liklihood of rust.





17.12 Frame


-----------


The most common areas for
frame rust on a 40 series are the gusset plates above


the rear-most spring
hangers, the rear crossmember, and the diagonals that


run from the frame rails
to the crossmember. As long as the frame rails


themselves are okay, most
of the gussets/brackets can be replaced. If the steel


looks like its
"delaminating," it is shot.





On pre-1981 trucks, the
frames also tend to crack where the boxing ends above


the front-most rear spring
perches. The crack tends to run longitudinally from


the rear-most rivet on the
perch towards the back of the truck. The spring


perches can also be
tweaked, especially if the truck has been running extended


shackles. As you sight
along the framerails the shackles should be


perpendicular to the
bottom flange. Tweaked fixed-pin spring perches are rarer,


but if a rear one is out
of alignment, chances are the frame has cracked.


Because of the stronger
design, perch/hanger problems aren't as common on post-


'81 40s and 42s. Feel
through the holes on the inboard sides of the frame


rails. Large flakes of
rust are a sign of problems to come.





60s and 70s only real
problems stem from rust. Their frame designs don't have


the same large holes as on
40s so they're harder to clean and more prone to


trapping crud and rusting.
Feel through the small access holes for signs of


rust flakes. The worst
spots for frame rust on 60s and 70s are where the


muffler is next to the
frame. It is possible for the steel to be weakened to


the point that a
screwdriver can easily be poked through it with no outwardly


visible warning signs.
The other big problem area is the rearmost section of


the frame where it is just
a channel (as opposed to fully boxed)





17.13 Inspection Checklist


--------------------------


Here's a handy checklist
to print out and take with you when going to look at a


prospective purchase. It'
based on the checklist used for the Coastal Cruisers


annual safety inspection:





OWNER INFO


Name:_________________________
Directions to truck's location:_____________


Address:______________________
____________________________________________


Phone Number:
(____)____-_____ ____________________________________________





VEHICLE INFO


Model:_________________
Production Date:_________ Mileage:__________________





ENGINE


Oil Level G A P


Oil Pressure G A P


Motor Mounts G A P


Spark/Glow Plugs G A P


Carb G A P


Governer Diaphragm G A P





COOLING SYSTEM


Radiator G A P


Overflow Bottle G A P NA


Hoses G A P


Belts G A P


Water Pump G A P





BATTERY TIE DOWNS


LF G A P NA


RF G A P NA





LIGHTS Head Lights
Markers Turn Signals Brake Reverse License


LF G A P G
A P G A P


RF G A P G A P
G A P


LR G
A P G A P G A P G A P


RR G
A P G A P G A P G A P G A P





SUSPENSION Springs
Bushings Shocks Shackles Centre Pins


LF G A P G
A P G A P G A P G A P


RF G A P G
A P G A P G A P G A P


LR G A P G
A P G A P G A P G A P


RR G A P G
A P G A P G A P G A P





EXHAUST


Manifold G A P


Pipes G A P


Muffler G A P





WIPERS G A P


HORN G A P





STEERING


Box G A P


Centre-Arm G A P NA


Tie Rod Ends G A P


Rag Joint G A P NA


U-Joints G A P NA


Slip Joint G A P NA





BRAKES Parking
Shoes/Pads Drums/Rotors Master Cyl.


LF G A P
G A P G A P


RF G A P
G A P


LR G A P G A P
G A P


RR G A P G A P
G A P





CLUTCH


Master Cyl G A P


Slave Cyl G A P





BEARINGS Wheel
Knuckle Pinion Transfer Case Output


LF G A P G A P


RF G A P G A P


F
G A P G A P


R
G A P G A P





SEALS Wheel Knuckle
Pinion Transfer Case Output


LF G A P G A P


RF G A P G A P


F
G A P G A P


R
G A P G A P





DRIVE SHAFTS U-Joint
Slip Joint


FF G A P
G A P


FR G A P


RF G A P
G A P


RR G A P





BODY Mounts Seat
Belts Roll Bar/Cage Sup.


LF G A P G A P
G A P


RF G A P G A P
G A P


LM G A P
G A P


RM G A P
G A P


LR G A P G A P
G A P


RR G A P G A P
G A P





BODY Fenders Rocker
Panels Quarter Panels Lower Door Windshield


LF G A P G A P
G A P G A P


RF G A P G A P
G A P G A P


LR G A P
G A P G A P G A P


RR G A P
G A P G A P G A P





FRAME Rails Perches
Hangers


LF G A P G A P
G A P


RF G A P G A P
G A P


LR G A P G A P
G A P


RR G A P G A P
G A P





18.0 Drivetrain Swaps


=====================





18.1 Non-Toyota Equipment


-------------------------


There is really no limit
as to the complexity of swaps you can attempt with a


Land Cruiser. The most
common modifications are swapping engines and


transmissions. Let me
begin by saying that I am not a big fan of putting


non-Toyota equipment into
Land Cruisers. I only decided to write this section


because I got tired of
people asking me about swaps and not being able to


provide any answers. This
section is incomplete and will probably remain that


way for quite some time
until fans of the various engines supply me with more


info. Also, because I do
not have first hand experience with anything in this


section, the chances of me
making errors is greater. If you have a functioning


2F in your truck, I would
leave well-enough alone. The engine is VERY heavy


duty, makes good low-end
torque, will never overheat provided your cooling


system is in good shape.
An older F is potentially a better candidate to be


removed and replaced with
a more modern setup. It should be noted that once you


pull the F series motor
from your truck, it is no longer a FJ40/55/60/... I prefer


the designation of V8J40.
I will talk about engine swaps retaining a Toyota


transmission, transmission
swaps retaining a Toyota engine, swaping in a new


engine and transmission
simultaneously, and finally, I'll touch on transfer case


and axle swaps.





18.2 Diesel Engine Swaps


------------------------


I'm starting here because
to me this is the swap that makes the most sense for a


rock-crawling machine and
is probably the least explored. As you'll figure out


shortly, I'm pretty
opinionated on this one and I welcome anyone to dispute my


views. I believe that
diesel engines are superior to gas ones for offroad use


for many reasons. They
tend to make usable torque at much lower engine speed


than gas engines. This
means you don't need nearly as low a crawl gear. They


also feature a much
flatter torque curve. There is no ignition system to fail


because of moisture. They
are not as affected by altitude, in fact, turbocharged


diesels are virtually
immune to altitude. In most cases, even though they have


all the advantages of a
fuel injected engine, such as the ability to run at


extreme angles, they rely
on mechanical injection which is considerably simpler


than electonic injection.
Diesel engines also tend to get much better fuel


economy and greater
cruising range than gas engines of similar displacement.





There are three commonly
available engines that are suitable for swapping into


Land Cruisers. Probably
the biggest obstacle to the conversion is finding the


engine itself. The GM
engines are the only ones listed here that are available


in light-duty automotive
applications. The others are all industrial/medium


duty truck engines. These
motors tend to be snapped up as soon as the vehicle


they were in is wrecked
and rebuilt by companies with exclusive licenses.


Unless you're willing to
pay top dollar for a rebuilt unit (not a bad idea) you


have to somehow find a way
to intercept a motor before the rebuilders get their


hands on it.





The most easily obtained
is the GM 6.2l diesel. A conversion kit is


available from Mark's
Adapters in Australia to mate a GM diesel to a Land


Cruiser 4 speed manual or
automatic transmission. The GM V8 supposedly weighs


about as much as a big
block, so pretty close to the weight of a 2F. The L65 is


found in C/K 2500HD
trucks, C/K 3500 trucks and C/K 2500 Suburbans. The L56 is


found in C/K 1500 trucks.
C/K 2500 LD Trucks, K1500 Blazers/Tahoes/Yukons, and


C/K 1500 Suburbans. The
6.2l is found in all pickups and Suburbans, and in


Chev/GMC P30/P3500 step
vans.





The 8th digit in the VIN
of the donor vehicle indicates the motor type:


MODEL
DESIGNATION LETTER


6.2L C


6.2L J


6.5L Y


6.5LT (L56) S


6.5LT (L65) F





The GM 5.7l is without a
doubt the worst diesel engine ever cobbled together.


It is the Olds 350 gas
block that was converted to diesel. Probably 99% of


these motors have been
blown apart for at least 10 years, but some may still be


kicking around. If
someone offers you one, they are NOT your friend.





A slightly more rare
engine that I see as being a better match to a Land Cruiser


is a Cummins B3.9 litre
turbo diesel. It was used in among other things, Ford


E350 cube vans, and Case
580 Tractors.





PowerMark used to offer a
conversion kit (p/n RK9525G) that was designed to


allow you to bolt in a
B3.5/5.9 in place of a GM 292 I6 or 350 V8 in GMC cube


vans. In order to put
this engine into a LC using the stock transmission, you


would simply need to get
the motor mounts/bellhousing Advance Adapters sells for


putting a V8 in and use
the Cummins engine instead, as well as possibly having


to modify the supplied
intake system and radiator hoses. Unfortunately,


PowerMark has now gone out
of business. Fleet Supply has bought up the


remainder of their stock
and plans to continue production. They also plan to


introduce a kit for
Chev/Ford pickups. The kits should be available from your


friendly neighbourhood
Cummins dealer.





I think the Cummins B5.9,
as used in Dodge Ram is definitely too heavy to put


into a 40 series, and is a
little heavy for a 55/60/80 series. It is also a


little on the long side.
The above mentioned kit would also work for a B5.9.





The best diesel swap into
an FJ40 I've ever seen is the Isuzu 3.9l diesel, model


number 4BD1T. Two of its
applications were in Isuzu NPR series cab-forward


trucks, and LINK-BELT
LS2700CII (4BDIT). I also believe it was used in the GM


Forward 3000-4000 series
trucks. There are two paths for putting an Isuzu


diesel into a Land
Cruiser. The first involves a factory Isuzu adapter


bellhousing. It is
designed to mate any SAE #3 flywheel cover to a GM manual


transmission with a 5.125"
bore (SM420). The bellhousing bears the casting


number WF 150015.
Unfortunately, this bellhousing has recently been


discontinued. There are
still some around--try your local Isuzu dealer. A


better option is an
adapter ring. I have yet to locate a commercial source for


these--the one I've seen
was made years back by a company that has since gone


out of business. The ring
allows a GM bellhousing with a 350 bolt pattern to be


attached to an SAE #3
flywheel cover. Using the adapter ring, it would be


possible to attach the
4BD1T directly to a Toyota transmission with an Advance


adapter Chev->Toyota
bellhousing.





18.2.1 Isuzu Engine Specs


-------------------------


DISP
(INDUST) TORQUE COMP


MODEL (CC) CYL FUEL
BHP* FT-LB RATIO





4BD1 3856 4 DD
88@2800 181@1600 17.1


4BD1T 3856 4 TDD
105@2500 240@1600 17.5:1


6BD1 5785 6 DD
142@2800 289@1600 17.5:1


6BD1T 5785 6 TDD
163@2500 375@1800 17.5:1





MODEL BORE STROKE
DRY WT LENGTH WIDTH HEIGHT


(IN) (IN)
(LBS) (IN) (IN) (IN)


4BD1 4.02 4.64 710
35.3 24.4 30.4


4BD1T 4.02 4.64 719
35.2 25.3 33.2


6BD1 4.02 4.64
1003 44.6 24.6 33.2


6BD1T 4.02 4.64
1089 44.6 26.4 37.4





*Figures according to SAE
J1349 Gross BHP test. "Automotive" BHP of the 4BD1T for


instance is actually
121@3000.





18.2.2 Cummins Engine Specs


---------------------------


DISP
TORQUE DRY WT LENGTH HEIGHT BORE


MODEL (CC) CYL
FUEL BHP FT-LB (LBS) (IN) (IN)


4BT3.9 39xx 4
TDD 105@2500 260@1500 705 30.1 35.6


4BTA3.9-120 39xx 4
TDDA 120@2500 302@1500 725 30.1 35.6


6AT3.4 3434 6
TDD 120@3600 221@2000 665 32.9 31.7


6BT5.9-160 59xx 6
TDD 160@2500 400@1500 880 39.6 36.8


6BTA5.9 59xx 6
TDDA 180@2500 451@1500 905 40.7 36.8





18.2.3.1 GM Diesel Specs


------------------------


YEARS
DISP STOCK TORQUE COMP


MODEL AVAIL
(CC) CYL FUEL HP FT-LB RATIO


5.7L 57xx
V8 ID ..... ...... ......


6.2L -94 62xx
V8 ID 150 250@2500 ......


6.5L 94- 65xx
V8 ID 170 290@2000 ......


6.5LT (L56) 94-
V8 TID 180@3400 360@1700 21.5:1


6.5LT (L65) 94-
V8 TID 190@3400 385@1700 21.5:1





18.2.3.2 GM Diesel Swap Specifics -
Aaron Leach (AARONL@corel.com)


------------------------------------------------------------------


The GM 6.2L mounts very
similarly to a GM gas V8. The back of the engine has


the same bolt pattern as
the 350





Most of the same
directions that come with the small block kit from Advance


The engine can mount so
that it is about three inches from the radiator, and


then the centerline of the
engine was placed at 12 inches from the left inside


frame rail to the center
of the engine--essentially the same as the small block


Chevy engine. One thing to
remember is that the 6.2 is a wide engine. The stock


steering box has to be
removed to make the engine fit. Installing a power


steering conversion, such
as the Saginaw box is required. Also, because of the


width of the engine, the
steering shaft should be lengthened an extra eighteen


inches. That prevents the
U-joint from hitting the exhaust manifold. The


cruise control mechanism
can be removed, and part of the air intake system must


be removed for hood
clearance. There is a spacer between the engine mount and


the block that is needed
to fit the engine properly.





What You Can Use, and What
You Cannot


Here is a list of things
you can use with the conversion, and what you cannot:





-you can use all GM Chevy
transmissions: TH350, TH400, 700R4, SM420, SM465, etc.


-you cannot use a gas
engine torque convertor, you have to use a diesel one.


-you cannot use a gas
engine flex plate or flywheel. The diesel's is balanced.


-Also, when using a flex
plate, there are two kinds, a lock-up type, and a non


lock-up type. Each uses a
different torque convertor.


-the injector pump has an
overflow tube. You will need to run a return line to


the fuel tank.





You will want to install a
diesel tachometer. These run off the alternator.


Diesels use their own
starters--you will not be able to use a gas engine one.


Diesels also use their own
engine cooling fan.


One battery will probably
fit, but two might be difficult. You can get a box


made that fits behind you
seat that will hold two batteries.


It might be wise to
already have a lift installed because the drive line might


hit the oil pan.


With the automatic
transmissions, you might have drive line problems in the


rear. My drive line for
the TH350 is going to be about twelve inches. The TH400


and the 700R4 are about 5
inches longer than the TH350.


You will need a filter
that takes water out of diesel fuel.


The diesel RPMS top out
around 3500. An over drive transmission, higher


differential gears, or
larger diameter tires will help with this situation.



Wiring the engine up





The engine is quite easy
to wire up. First of all, the wires going to the


starter are the same as
they are on the gas engines. Secondly, the coil wire


goes to the injector pump.
There are two prongs on the injector pump. Which ever


prong you put the coil
wire on, you will need to jump a wire from there onto


the other prong. You can
throw the coil away, you will not need it. Also, the


wire that went from the
coil to the distributor is not needed.





To wire the glow plugs up,
you can run a wire to a push button switch, then


from there to two 70 amp
relays, one for each side of the engine. If you don't


want to hold the button
down to control the glow time, you can add a timer


relay.





You can also hook this up
to the ignition. The only difference is that the


ignition would be your
push button switch part of it.





18.2.4 Nissan Diesel Specs


--------------------------


DISP
TORQUE COMP


MODEL (CC) CYL FUEL
BHP FT-LB RATIO


SD33T 3245 6 T?D
101@3100 175@2200 21:1





MODEL BORE STROKE
DRY WT LENGTH WIDTH HEIGHT


(IN) (IN)
(LBS) (IN) (IN) (IN)


SD33T 3.27 3.94





FUEL


ID - Indirect
Injection Diesel


DD - Direct Injection
Diesel


T - Turbo


A - Aftercooled
(erroniously called Intercooled by most)





8.3 Gas Engine Conversions


---------------------------1


Ok, you've put up with my
compression-ignitionist rantings for a while and have


made it into the section
that interests most people. There are some advantages


to replacing your F series
motor with a newer V8. The V8 weighs 250lb less than


the F, which leads to a
big improvement in your power to weight ratio. Because


the newer motor is a
little more effecient, and also because of the weight


savings, you will get
improved fuel economy. The engine that is most commonly


swapped into a Land
Cruiser is the venerable Chev 350. Other conversions, in


approximate decreasing
order of quantity are Chev 307, 383, 305, 400, 327, Ford


302/5.0l, Chev 454,
Pontiac 455, Chev 4.3l V6. Swapping a Chev 235 I6 into a


Cruiser is pointless
because it is basically identical to an F. The Chev 292


may be a worthwhile swap
for those who want that "authentic straight-six feel"


Unfortunately, this engine
is quite fuel hungry like the 2F and parts aren't


nearly as common as for
the 350.




Even though distributor
placement at the front of Ford engines is probably


better than the rear
placement of Chev small block distributors, and the Ford


302 weighs 80lb. less than
a 350, Chev engines are probably used ten times more


frequently. The big
reason is parts availability. While ford was wandering


around in Windsor and
Cleveland, the 350 changed very little over the years.





For that reason, a plain
350 is probably the easiest choice for an engine


conversion. There are a
variety of conversion kits available and the engine can


be found in both
carburated and fuel injected forms. For those looking for more


low-end torque, a 383 is
probably the best choice. A 383 is a 350 that's been


bored .030 over and uses a
400 crank and 350 connecting rods. A 383 is superior


to a 400 because the bore
of the 400 is too large. There's no space left


between the cylinders for
water jackets so cooling is compromised.





There are only a couple of
reasons for putting a motor bigger than a 383 or even


building a high horsepower
350. They are if you intend to put on tires that are


so large that re-gearing
to return the tire:gear ratio to something approaching


a stock level is
impossible, if you drive your truck in deep mud, snow, or sand,


or if you never quite
managed to get that adolescent desire to try to peel your


tires off your rims out of
your system.





On the other side of the
coin, the 4.3l Chev 6 is probably a little too small


for even a 40 series.





Key engine design features
to keep in mind are the bore and stroke. Engines


with a larger bore than
stroke (oversquare) are better suited to high-RPM


operation, while engines
with a larger stroke than bore are better for lugging


down at low RPMs. A
longer stroke also allows for a lower compression ratio and


lower octane fuel.





Once you have decided
which engine you want to use, the next step is to choose


an adapter type.
Depending on the engine you have selected, you can either


use a bellhousing from
Advance Adapters, a Ranger torque splitter, or a Mark's


Adapter.





In order to use an Advance
Adapter bellhousing, the flywheel from the engine


manufacturer must be used.
In the case of small block engines, the


manufacturer's heavier
truck type flywheel is required and is advantageous


because it will allow for
smoother operation of the engine at lower revs. The


advantage of using an
Advance Adapter bellhousing is the low cost of the adapter


itself. This savings
leads to higher expenses elsewhere though. Because the


Advance Adapter
bellhousing is approximately the same thickness as the stock


Toyota one, the engine,
transmission, and transfercase will have to be shifted


forward to all sufficient
firewall clearance. The movement of the transfercase


will require modified
driveshafts. The use of the Advance Adapter bellhousing


will also require a custom
clutch only offered by Advance Adapters. It's


probably best not to use a
clutch that is not univerally available.





The use of a Ranger Torque
Splitter provides several advantages. Foremost, you


get a 27% overdrive for
lower revs on the highway. You can use a stock


Chev/Ford bellhousing and
clutch. The Torque splitter functions as an adapter.


it can be ordered with
Chev or Ford bolt and inputshaft patterns on the front


and Toyota input shaft
patterns on the back. Finally, the 7-8" of extra


thickness of the Ranger
means that driveshaft modifications are not required.


The Ranger is said to put
the fan a little closer to the radiator than ideal


though.





The third option is the
Mark's adapter. Their kit consists of a bellhousing and


flywheel that are 3-1/2"
deeper than stock. The extra depth places the engine


perfectly with no
driveshaft modifications. The extra thick flywheel also


provides extra damping to
allow for smoothly lugging down the revs in the rocks.





18.3.1 GM Engine specs


----------------------


YEARS DISP
STOCK TORQUE COMP


MODEL AVAIL (CC)
CYL FUEL HP FT-LB RATIO


231 B ..... .... V6
G ..... ........ .....


252 B ..... .... V6
G ..... ........ .....


235 C ..... .... I6
G 120-150 ........ .....


250 CPOB ..... .... I6
G ..... ........ .....


262 75-76 .... I6
G 110 ........ 8.5:1


265 55-57 .... V6
G 162-225 ........ 8.0:1


265 C 94- 4343 V6
G 163 ........ .....


265 C(HO) 94- 4343 V6
G 200 ........ .....


267 C 79-81 .... V6
G 115-125 ........ .....


283 C 57-67 .... V8
G 135-230 ........ 8.5:1-11.0:1


283FI


292 C ..... .... I6
G ....... ........ .....


302 C 67-69 .... V8
G 290 ........ 11.0:1


305 C 76-94 .... V8
G 125-230 ........ 8.5-9.0


307 C 68-73 .... V8
G 115-195 240@2000 8.5-9.0


327 C 62-69 .... V8
G 150-235 ........ 8.8-11.3


327FI C .... V8
EFI-G 370


350 C 67- .... V8
G 145-300 300@2000 8.5-11.0


350 C ..... .... V8
EFI-G ....... ........ .......


383 C NEVER .... V8
G ....... ........ .......


400 C 70-80 .... V8
G 150-180 ........ 8.5-9.0


454 C ..... .... V8
G ....... ........ .......


455 P ..... .... V8
G ....... ........ .......


500 V ..... .... V8
G ....... ........ .......





MODEL BORE STROKE
WEIGHT LENGTH HEIGHT


(IN) (IN)
(LBS) (IN) (IN)


235 C 3.56 3.96


262 C 3.671 3.10
...... ...... ......


265 C 3.730 3.00 550
25 26-1/2


267 C 3.500 3.48
...... ...... ......


283 C 3.875 3.00 550
25 26-1/2


302 C 4.000 3.00 550
25 26-1/2


305 C 3.736 3.48
...... ...... ......


307 C 3.875 3.25 550
25 26-1/2


327 C 4.000 3.25
...... ...... ......


350 C 4.000 3.48 550
25 26-1/2


400 C 4.125 3.75 550
25 26-1/2





B - Buick


C - Chev


O - Oldsmobile


P - Pontiac


V - Cadillac





18.3.2 Ford Engine Specs


------------------------


YEARS DISP
STOCK TORQUE COMP


MODEL AVAIL (CC)
CYL FUEL HP FT-LB RATIO


260 V8
G 164@4400 258@2200 8.8:1


289 64- V8
G 200-271 282-312 9.3:1


300 4916 I6
G -150 ..... .....


302 68- 4948 V8
G 210-235 295-318 8.5:1


302 4948 V8
EFI-G ..... ..... .....


351W 69- .... V8
..... 250-300 355-380 8.6:1


351C .... V8
..... ..... ..... .....


351M .... V8
..... ..... ..... .....


460 .... V8
EFI-G 250 355.. .....





MODEL BORE STROKE
WEIGHT LENGTH HEIGHT


(IN) (IN)
(LBS) (IN) (IN)


260 3.8 2.87


289 4 2.87


302 4 3.0 425


351W 4 3.5 510


351C 550


351M 550


400M 550


460





18.4 Transmission Swaps


-----------------------


The three domestic
transmissions most commonly swapped into a Land Cruiser are


the SM420 (used in Chev
trucks until 1969) SM465 (used in Chev trucks from 1969-


1992) and NV4500 (used in
GM and Dodge trucks from 1992-)





MODEL MAKER OFFERED
IN DATES SPD 1ST 2ND 3RD 4TH 5TH R


SM420 Muncie GM Trucks
47-67 4 7.05 3.57S 1.70S 1.00S 7.05


SM465 Muncie GM Trucks
68-92? 4 6.54 3.58S 1.70S 1.00S 6.09


NV4500 New GM Trucks
92-94 5 6.34S 3.44S 1.71S 1.00S 0.73S 6.34


Vent- Dodge Trucks
92- 5 5.61S 3.04S 1.67S 1.00S 0.74S 5.61S


ure gear GM Trucks
94- 5 5.61S 3.04S 1.67S 1.00S 0.74S 5.61S





MODEL LENGTH BORE


(IN) (IN)


SM420 10.5 4.686


SM465 12.0 5.125


NV4500 12.0 5.125





Legend


S following a gear ratio
indicated synchronized





The SM420 is probably the
most popular transmission swap for a LC because of its


extremely low first gear.
It also has the advantage of being virtually a direct


bolt-up to a three Toyota
3 speed bellhousing. All that is required is some


minor drilling, a pilot
bearing adapter, and a throwout bearing sleave, and an


adapter and spud shaft to
go between the transmission and transfer case. The


biggest disadvantage with
the SM420 is parts availability. Because the


transmission hasn't been
made in almost 30 years, many of the parts have been


discontinued. Adapting
the transmission to a truck that formerly had a 4 speed


transmission is also a bit
more involved, requiring either an adapter


bellhousing or a modified
3 speed bellhousing to be fitted.





The bolt pattern and bore
of the SM465 is different so it will not bolt up to


either the 3 speed or 4
speed bellhousing. Although it has a higher first gear


ratio, this transmission
definitely a better than the swap for those removing a


Toyota 4 speed because the
parts will be readily available from your local GM


dealer. The SM465 is also
somewhat beefier than the SM420.





The NV4500 is probably the
ultimate domestic transmission. It has both granny


low and overdrive in a
package that is approximately the same length as an


SM420. It is built to
handle high horsepower and torque so the internals are


very strong. The big
drawback for this transmission is that because it is so


new, it is very rare in
junkyards. It is also extremely popular which drives


the price up. The early
GM unit is the hardest to find. Probably the ultimate


setup is the Early GM/Late
GM and Dodge hybrid which gives you the low first


gear of the early GM unit
combined with the better third gear ratio and


synchronized reverse of
the Late GM/Dodge transmission.





Of course, all the above
mentioned transmission swap will require driveshaft


length changes.





If you swap a domestic
transmission in along with a domestic engine, matters are


simplified. You just have
to find the domestic bellhousing that will fit your


engine and has the correct
bore for your desired transmission.





18.5 Transfer Case/Axle Swaps


-----------------------------


Swapping a non-Land
Cruiser transfer case into your truck is a difficult


proposition. This is due
to the fact that all but the very early Land Cruiser


axles have both
differentials offset to the passenger's side. Virtually all


domestic vehicles have the
front differential offset to the driver's or


passenger's side while the
rear differential is centred. If you use a domestic


transfer case with Land
Cruiser axles, you will wind up with a two-plane


driveshaft angle.
Apparently, the axle housing can be reversed to decrease the


angle, but this is still a
very unadvisable setup.





If a domestic transfer
case is required, the axles should be replaced as well.


Dana 60s and up are the
only axles that are comparable/superior in strength to


the stock Land Cruiser
axles. Reverse-cut Dana 60s have the pinion located


above the centreline of
the ring gear and will result in somewhat improved


driveshaft angles in
trucks with a great deal of lift.





19.0 Maintenance/Modifications


==============================





19.1 Aluminum Tubs - Rob Mullen
(RAMullen@wimsey.com)


-----------------------------------------------------


I've got an Aluminum tub
on my Cruiser and I love it. It sure beats having


things fall out the rust
holes in the back and getting a spray of water on you


from where the rear wheel
wells used to be :) There are two schools of thought


when it comes to tubs:





Retain the steel sills (my
style)


Description/Materials:


The steel sills around
the doors and along the top of the tub were retained


(the remainder of the
sheet metal is cut away with an air nibbler) Mine goes


from the firewall back.
My tub is all 1/8" Aluminum plate with bits of


6061-T6 1/8" wall
structural (round corner) square tubing/channel for body


mounts and gas tank
strap mounts.


Cost:


Mine cost me CA$2400
(US$1700+/-) but that included a new fuel tank & sender,


and I also got a
"better shape than mine" hard top thrown in for free (a


one-time lucky break
for me) Keep in mind that my tub was for the body style


with the gas tank under
the floor and required quite a bit of bending on a


hydraulic brake to make
the right shape.


Advantages:


+ Doors and hard top
fit properly


+ Slightly more body
rigidity


+ Sides are held on
with pop rivets + a few tack welds and can be easily


removed/replaced if
damaged


Disadvantages:


- Steel can continue to
rust along the edges until pop rivets securing


aluminum to steel
pull out (requires finding some steel sqaure tubing with


the same OD as the
sill's ID shoving it in and re-riveting--I'm probably


going to have to do
this soon on the driver's side at least)


- not a "bolt-on"
installation - requires a reasonably skilled sheet metal


worker to cut old
steel away nicely


- not widely available.
Most tubs in this style are home made/made by local


Cruiser gurus and are
therefore harder to find (Mine was built by a


Cruiser fanatic that
used to make aluminum boats for a living)





All aluminum (style
manufactured in Kelowna--Aqualu/Land Cruiser Solutions)


Description/Materials:


One note: The tubs I'm
talking about is made by a Kelowna, B.C. company


called Aqualu
Industries. These are sold east of the Mississippi by


Land Cruisr Solutions.
Anyways, on with the description:





The entire tub behind
the "drip rail" that runs down in front of the door


hinges is hacked away.
The sills are replaced with 6061-T6 1/8"


round-edge... which
leads to the door/hard top fit problems described by Gary


Bjork. Here's a
quickie ascii illustration of the cross-section of the lower


part of the door and
sill to show you:





Stock
doors/sills Kelowna style body


| |
| |


|Door|
| |


| __/
| __/


| |O ||
| |O +------+ Legend


|_|O / |__
|_|O | | O = Rubber Seal


/ |
| |


/ Sill |
| |


|______|
|______|


|
|


|
|





As you can (hopefully)
see, the stock doors fit flush into the body whereas


the "Kelowna
Style" stick out by an amount equivalent to the width of the


bottom edge of the door
(about 1/2"?) The hard top also sticks out by this


by the width of the
bottom edge. The tub is made from material thinner than


1/8" (3/32",
I think) and is available with both checker and smooth sides.


If you only run a soft
top and soft doors, the fit problems I described above


will not really be
noticable.





There is now a version
of the tub available with "factory-style" sills. It


costs extra though.




Cost:


NO SILLS
SILLS


EARLY-78 CA$1955
(~US$1396) CA$2475 (~US$1768)


79-84 CA$2346
(~US$1675) CA$2865 (~US$2046)




Advantages:


+ minimal cutting -
true bolt-on installation


+ don't have to worry
about sills rotting away


+ if your're truck has
been rolled/crashed you instantly get a straight tub!


+ much easier to move
to a newer/better Cruiser if you buy one at a later date


Disadvantages:


- door/top fit problems
outlined earlier (if you cheap out and don't get


sills)


- completely welded
together - if you tweak it, you have to live with it




So there you have it,
everything you ever wanted to know about aluminum tubs


(but were afraid to ask)
ALMOST. Here's a few details that apply to both styles:





Aluminum is MUCH more
difficult to paint than steel. A good finish would


probably require going to
a high-end paint shop (Your local "Oh-Oh, better get a


new paint job" place
probably couldn't handle it)





Aluminum tubs can't really
be fixed if they're severly kinked/dented (or at


least not as well as a
conventional steel sheet metal body. I talked to my


insurance agent about mine
and she thought that replacing my tub in the event of


an accident would be
covered under the same heading as aluminum pick-up


canopies.





Aqualu makes aluminum
front fenders, but they were kind of ugly IMHO. Because


they could only roll and
not stamp the fenders, they couldn't duplicate the


compound curves at the
front of the fender and just left off the last little


curve on the front of the
fender. They sold for something like CA$395 a pair





Finally, for those of you
that don't like aluminum, I have seen a replacement


tub made out of 3/16"
STEEL! I suspect it would have made the truck into a


complete slug, however
resistance to small arms fire would be a huge advantage


to anyone living in
LA/Washington/Detroit :)





19.2 Breather Relocation - Rob
Mullen (RAMullen@wimsey.com)


-----------------------------------------------------------


NOTE: It's been a while
since I've done this and may have forgotten


something, also, this is
the last article I typed in for v1.0 so I'm pretty


fried. If I say something
that seems wrong, it probably is. Anyone who


tries these directions,
drop me a line and let me know if I missed anything.





Depending on what year and
model of Cruiser you own, you may have the pop


valve axle breathers
mounted directly to the axle housing. If you truck ever


sees any water off-road
(or good flooding on road) this set-up is inadequate.


The check valves always
become clogged. This either allows water to stream


into your axle housing, or
worse, does not allowing your axle to breathe which


results in blown seals
which THEN let water in. For water over bumper height,


even Toyota's breather
hoses that reach up to the frame height aren't enough.





Fortunately, replacing
your breathers is both simple and cheap. First you


must remove the check
valves. Before doing this, ensure the area around the


breather is free of
mud/grime--you don't want to have any grit falling into


the breather hole and
wearing your ring and pinion. Once the valves are out,


check the threads to
determine if they're fine or coarse (all breathers after


1971 are fine thread.
Some rear breathers from prior to 71 are coarse. I am


not sure if this procedure
would work with coarse threads so attempt it at


your own risk.
Temporarily pop the valves back in and go to your hardware


store.





You will need 2 1/4"
brass right angle NPT to compression fittings, 2 plastic


ferrules and hose inserts,
15' of 1/4"OD nylon hose (poly will do in a pinch, a T


junction with compression
fittings on all sides, a whole whack of small


*zip-ties, a 10mm tapping
die (same thread as your breathers), some 3/8"


washers, 2 M10x1.25 nuts,
3" of 1/4"ID rubber hose (like fuel line), 2 1/4" hose


clamps, cutting fluid (oil
will do in a pinch), Blue Loctite 242, and


(recommended but not
required) 15' of corregated wire loom covering that will


fit over the pipe. If
your axles are the style where the rear breather comes


up through the brake line
T, you will also need a 1-1/2" length of 3/8" brass


pipe (often available as a
pre-threaded length) and a fitting for joining the


pipe to the right angle
fitting.





The following procedure
applies to situations where the brass pipe and coupler


are not required.





1. Re-cut the NPT threads
on the angle fittings with a 10mmx1.25 die. If you


don't have a die
handle, you can always use a wrench, but this increases


your chances of
cross-threading. Don't forget 1 turn forwards, 1/2 turn


back, and use lots of
cutting fluid. You may have a couple of threads that


are messed up because
of interference between the metric and NPT threads,


but it should still be
strong enough.


2. Coat the threads on the
fitting with Blue Loctite


3. Thread a M10x1.25 nut
onto the right angle fitting.


4. Thread the right angle
fitting into the axle until it won't go any farther


(DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN --
the brass is nowhere near as strong as steel)


5. Back the fitting off
until it's pointing in the direction you want.


6. Tighten the bolt.





The following procedure
applies to those who bought the brass pipe and coupler





1. Coat the coupler's
threads with Blue Loctite. Thread the pipe into one end and


the right angle fitting
into the other.


2. Re-cut the threads on
the pipe as per #1 above. Cut approximately 5/16" of


threads.


3. Coat the pipe's threads
with Loctite


4. Thread the assembly
into the axle. (If tightens pointing in the wrong


direction, remove it
and try shimming it with a washer so it points in the


right direction)





Once the angles are in
place, you can put on the hose.





1. Remove the compression
nut and brass ferrule from the right angle fitting.


2. Plan out the routing of
your hose. It is best to have it travel up along


the brake lines, that
way there is less of a chance of the hose being


damaged by branches etc
under the truck. A good location for the T is


right against the brake
line L that is mounted on the frame below the


master cylinder. True
hard-core types who don't mind the smell of gear


oil can route the line
that comes off the T through the firewall into the


passenger compartment
for maximum fording ablility. Otherwise if you're


not equipped with a
snorkle, plan to send the line up along the fire wall


to hood height. Those
lucky enough to have snorkels should route the line


up the back side of the
snorkle.


3. Once you've planned the
route, cut the plastic tubing and loom cover to the


required lengths.


4. Slide the compression
nut and a plastic ferrule onto each end of the hose.


5. Place the hose inserts
inside each end of the hose to prevent it from being


crushed when you
tighten the compression nuts.


6. Slide the hose into the
angle fitting, and tighten the compression nut.


7. Route the hose along
the frame of the truck and attach the other end to the


T.


8. Snap the loom cover
over the hose and zip tie it securely to the frame or a


brake line along its
whole length.


9. Place the compression
nut ferrule and hose insert onto one end of the hose


that is to be routed up
along the firewall/into the passenger


compartment/up the
snorkle and tighten it down.


10. Thead/stuff the one of
the old breather pop valves into the rubber hose


and clamp it securely
with a hose clamp.


11. Fit the other end of
the rubber hose over the top of the plastic tubing


and clamp it with the
second hose clamp.





Now your axles are
waterproof (if the seals are good :) Unfortunately, there


are still two breathers
you must worry about for SERIOUS fording. They are on


the transfer case and
steering box. Unfortunately, I haven't gotten around to


relocating these yet. All
that will be required when I do this is splicing


two more T's into the
plastic tubing. The steering box should require a


procedure identical to the
one outlined here, but I think the transfer case


may have a different sized
breather plug and require something more creative.





19.3 G.M. HEI distributors for F/2F
Motors - David Dannenberg (suedave@pond.com)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Unfortunately, what I
present here will not allow a one banana mechanic to go to


spend twenty bucks at a
junk yard then an hour under the hood and end up with an


HEI in his FJ--not one
that works anyway. This conversion can be either


relatively simple or
relatively cheap, but not both at this point. I'll explain


below, but first a word or
two about the shortcomings of the Toyota ignitions


and the advantages of the
HEI.





The Toyota ignitions have
one or a number of disadvantages, depending which


particular distributer one
is stuck with. The early units feature a points


system, and a pretty lousy
points system at that. Compared to a later GM points


system for example they
are a pain to set, and not of very good quality. Even


good points systems have
the disadvantage of physical wear of the contacts


themselves as well as the
rubbing block which makes contact with the lobe on the


distributer shaft causing
them to open and close





Another aside: converting
a Toy points to electronic. One can get around the


problem of having points
by obtaining a conversion kit from Crane Cams. This


kit consists of a Hall
effects switch utilizing some sort of electronic gizmo to


do the job of the points
(which is to send an electronic pulse back to the coil


causing the field to
collapse and the coil's stored energy to be sent out the


wire to the distributer).
This kit costs around a hundred bucks I think and is


reputedly about a one
banana installation. However, even conversion of the stock


distributer to electronic
leaves one with at least one and possibly two other


inherent shortcoming of
the Toy ignition.





The Toy coil is pretty
poor. It is comparatively weak (20,000 volts or


something). The other
problem with the Toy coil is that it doesn't saturate


quickly enough so that at
high RPMs it is not fully saturated when the point


closes and causes it to
discharge its energy. That is, at high speed, one


doesn't even get the
measly 20KV or whatever it is designed to produce. The


performance problem
created by this is high speed miss--failure of some of the


plugs to fire every time
they are supposed to. This may or may not be very


noticeable in the pedal
except maybe when under load such as when trying to


blast on over that
mountain pass, but it could be noticeable at the tail pipe


(if one had a sniffer I
suppose) and at the gas pump--well, the gas gauge


anyway.





The last problem with some
Toyo ignitions, especially late electronic ones, is


that they are, in common
parlance, "smogged". That is, their advance curves are


not set up to optimize
performance as determined by acceleration, torque, and


horse power, but to
optimize emissions, especially at idle. Without getting into


the details and nuances of
this (which, like all of this, I have only


rudimentary understanding
of), the smogged distributors are set up so that at


low RPMs the ignition is
actually vacuum retarded, and such that the vacuum


advance does not occur
until much higher RPMs than would be optimal. For


practical purposes this
translates to that frightening feeling in the pit of the


stomach one gets when
trying to merge or pass on the highway in an FJ60--you


know, 0-60 in five minutes
while all you can see in your rear view mirror are


one headlight and the
letters A C K written backwards across part of an enormous


radiator grille.





The GM HEI can resolve all
of these problems! (and it makes Julienne fries).


I'll address them one at a
time. The points issue becomes moot because, as the


name implies, the HEI is
all electronic. Again without getting into details that


are both out of my depth
unimportant for the purposes of this discussion, an


electronic ignition
accomplishes communication between the distributer and the


coil with an electronic
(read: not mechanical) device. The guts of the


distributer contain a
commonly available module held in place with two


fasteners, a condenser,
and a field coil. None of these parts move, so in


theory at least, none of
them wear. The only moving part is the rotor (and


obviously the shaft to
which the rotor is fixed).





An aside: It is often said
that the problem with an electronic ignition is that


if it does fail, you are
dead in the water (sometimes literally) with no hope of


repair, whereas with a
points system you always have the option of adjustment or


replacement of components
in the field (or stream, as the case may be). There is


truth to this, but
distorted truth. It is true that one can't pop open the


ignition module (a thing
about the size of a pack of Dentine--Chicklets for


those of you in SA--with
two wires and two screw holes), jam a wrench in there


and fix it. But,the points
system is many times more likely to fail in the first


place. Second, it is no
big deal to carry a spare module, field coil, and


condenser in your glove
box--even ones stripped off a junked vehicle. It is true


that new these parts cost
considerably more $ than a set of points, but over


time one is unlikely to
use one module for every, say, 50 sets of points and


the ones from the junk
yard will likely get you home.





The second problem with
Toy ignitions, that of weak spark and inadequate


saturation, is solved by
the HEI coil. According to the guys at K&A in


California (see below),
the HEI produces 90,000 volts (!) consistently at any


RPM that we could imagine
generating in one of our engines. I have also heard


that the HEI coil produces
60,000 volts or even only 45,000 volts which is still


double what the Toy puts
out. This translates to hotter spark which translates


to better cold starting,
better running and adios to high speed miss. This alone


is something one can feel
in the pedal (and see in the decreased rate of decent


of the needle on the gas
gauge). With this much energy the spark plugs can be


gapped way open--some
people go as far as 65 or even 85, mine are at 45--which


helps also (I think by
making a bigger and thus more effective spark. Someone


who knows please feel free
to explain this).





Yet another aside: I
suppose that one could, if satisfied with the advance curve


of the stock distributer,
but desiring electronic reliability and HEI umph,


perform the hall effects
(Crane Cams) conversion mentioned above, and install


the HEI coil only, along
with good ignition wires and spark plugs and get about


everything the full (coil
and distributer) HEI conversion offers. That'd make it


a two banana $125 job.
Someone try this and report back to us all.





The last Toy problem that
one can resolve with the HEI is that of horrible


advance curve. This is not
solved by anything inherent in the HEI distributer


except that there is such
a wide range of advance parts available--springs and


diaphragms--that the
distributer can be built to do almost anything desired


(even making julien fries
at precisely at 2100 RPMs). This is one of the aspects


of the conversion that
jumps its rating from 2 to almost 4 bananas. It is also


second aspect of the
system that gives it such a great feel (the first being the


voltage discussed above).





Before briefly sketching
the options and methods for converting to the HEI, I


must tell you the
performance gains. I can start cold without choking the engine


(I do use the hand
throttle a bit to facilitate warm up). I have what feels like


way more torque and horse
power. I can accelerate much faster and smoother than


before and maintain speed
more easily. Around town I shift gears much less


frequently. Many corners
and hills that I used to take in second gear I now take


in third, corners and
hills I used to take in third I now take in fourth. In


many more instances than
pre-HEI I can start out from a stop in second gear or


overdrive first without
slipping the clutch. Driving is just so much more


pleasurable. I keep
telling people that with the HEI and the OME I feel like I


have a new vehicle. Those
of you with the OME know what I mean. Now imagine that


dramatic a change in your
engine. (Remember though, that much of this drama is


tied to the advance
curve--if you have a comparatively unsmogged vehicle, your


stock distributer may have
a decent curve already, so the big change will be in


reliability and high RPM
performance, not low end torque and acceleration. Your


challenge will be more to
match your existing curve, not to improve it).





So, I bet you are
wondering how to accomplish this astonishing transformation of


your slugabed TLC into a
rocket ship--well decently performing vehicle anyway.


There are four ways that I
know of. I will describe each in descending order of


cost and ascending order
of reliability and work.





1. K&L Engineering In
Mira Loma California (714) 735-4182 manufactures HEIs


specifically for TLCs.
By manufacture I mean that they take an HEI, strip it


down, wind precisely
engineered advance springs and mill precisely engineered


cams to get the desired
advance curve, then put it on a modified Sun


distributer machine to
check it all out. I believe that they will relocate


the gear as necessary.
They have done many TLCs, and if they have not done


your year and model
they may ask you to send your stock distributer so that


they can check it in
their Sun machine first to learn the factory curve which


they will match and
tweak in the HEI they will build for you. These guys have


been building racing
engines and using HEIs on all sorts of vehicles (VWs


even) for years and
really seem to know what they are talking about.


DISCLAIMER: I have
never actually purchased anything from them and do not


work for or represent
them. I did however pick their brains mercilessly


whilst GMF Bob and I
worked out our own approach to the conversion. The K&L


distributer will cost
in the neighborhood of $300.





2. Toyotas R Us in Salida
Colorodo. (719) 539-7733 also will sell you an HEI


for the TLC. They are
also really nice guys whose brains I picked pretty


thoroughly. They do a
conversion using off the shelf parts and I think charge


around $235 with a
core. As far as I can tell they do not use a distributer


machine or wind springs
or grind cams to match advance curves. I did not get


the feeling when I
spoke with them (1-2 years ago by now) that they had not


done any conversions in
late model Cruisers. I do not think that they swap of


move the distributer
gear, but CHECK WITH THEM, DO NOT RELY ON MY


INTERPRETATION OF
CONVERSATIONS I HAD A LONG TIME AGO. Again, they are real


nice people with a good
reputation. They told me their system works. It is


not, AFIK, and IMHO, as
sophisticated as the work done by K&A. I have not


actually purchased
anything from them, and do not in any way represent them.





3. Wayne Kitter of Up &
Over Innovations in Chester PA (610) 358-3179. He also


offers an HEI for the
TLC. He moves the gear, and sets it up (advance curve)


using off the shelf
components and a Sun machine. Sounds like he knows what he


is doing.





4. Do it yourself. If you
have been reading through all this expecting to come


upon step by step part
by part instructions now is your time to be


disappointed. If you
are expecting to get the general idea and be pointed in


the right direction to
get started, I hope and intend that the following will


be useful to you.





The swapping of GM parts
onto F and 2F engines is possible because the F was


essentially a "metricized"
GM 225.





The distributer is caused
to rotate by a gear on its shaft which engages a gear


on the engine's cam shaft.
The tip of the distributer shaft also turns the oil


pump. A 1977 CHEVROLET
NOVA DISTRIBUTER will fit the 2F engine block in all


respects. However, the
gear on the Nova distributer is located in a slightly


different place than the
Toyota one. So the FIRST STEP, after getting a good


reliable rebuilt '77 Nova
distributer or getting a junked one and crossing your


fingers IS TO RELOCATE THE
TOYOTA DRIVE GEAR TO PRECISELY THE SAME PLACE ON THE


GM DISTRIBUTER SHAFT AS IT
WAS ON THE TOYOTA SHAFT. Use a caliper. Go to a


machine shop. Do not mess
around with this. I can tell you from painful


experience that a few
thousandths of an inch of difference in location is plenty


enough to create force on
the shaft pulling it down into the field coil


gradually wearing through
the insulation until it suddenly and catastrophically


shorts out. Not big fun.





Now that you have
relocated the gear, the next step is to obtain or fabricate


some kind of clamp to hold
it in place. Straightforward--eyeball the situation


and make something or ask
at the parts source (store or junk yard) for something


that will work





Now the real fun begins.
The advance curve on the '77 Nova is not correct for


the TLC (at least it was
not for mine). So get out a vacuums gauge and


tachometer and chart your
advance under various conditions with various commonly


available springs and
advance diaphragms (GM makes them incrementally from


something like 5-25
degrees) and at various static timing settings. Watch your


temperature gauge too as
you road test it. I can tell you--again from painful


experience--that if the
timing is too far retarded you can run hot enough that


it simply shuts down, even
though it is smooth and the only other problem is


lack of power (like duh, I
know now). And of course too far advanced and it'll


knock like crazy and you
could even crunch a valve. Eventually you will hit upon


a combination that will
work for your vehicle. It will help to chart the


performance of your stock
unit too. This is already charted to some extent in


the back of the Toyota
engine manual. This is the science and voodoo of this


project and is what the
folks at K&L do on their machine. Personally, I think


that is well worth 300
bucks, except that you are deprived of the pleasure of


eventually getting it
right yourself.





I haven't mentioned the
coil in awhile. Some HEI systems had the coil mounted on


the distributer cap, some
remotely. They are (for practical purposes),


electronically equivalent.
In an FJ60, a remote coil must be used because the


bigger cap of the cap
mounted units will not clear the line to the oil cooler.


The cap mounted unit may
fit on other models. The coil needs only the hot that


supplies the toy coil, a
ground, and the ignition wire to the cap. Easiest part


of the conversion.





GM F Bob and I have had it
in our heads for a long time to make and market a kit


to take the guess work out
of doing the HEI to TLC conversion. It would contain


stuff to make the gear
relocation simple, and charts for selecting the correct


advance and other parts.
It would be inexpensive, intended more as a service to


the community than to make
a lotta' money. The buyer would source his or her


own distributer and maybe
some other stuff. Unfortunately GM F Bob is too busy


with school and his family
and I am too busy with work and my family to put this


together anytime before
next summer at the earliest.





So if you are very
patient, you may be able to get a kit for under $75 that will


help you do an HEI
conversion yourself in under two hours utilizing locally


available parts. If you
are ambitious, I think that the information I have


provided will get you
started. If you are in a hurry contact K&L and/or Toyotas-


R-Us. If you have any
questions or corrections, fire away and I'll do my best.


One thing nice about this
upgrade to your Toyota is that it is reversible: you


can always go back to your
Toy system in about a half hour's time. No permanent


modifications are made to
your Toy engine.





19.4 Glow Plugs - Rob Mullen
(RAMullen@wimsey.com)


--------------------------------------------------


It is considerably cheaper
to buy your glow plugs from somebody other than


Toyota. NGK makes 2
models that fit B's, 3B's, and 2H's. The part number for


the 24V version is Y197R.
The 12V version is not available in North America.





In the event that your
glow plugs fail far from civilizaton, it is still


possible to start your
truck (as long as it is not too cold outside) Simply


heat a largish pot of
water until it is about to come to a rolling boil. Then


pour the hot water over
the intake manifold and injection nozzles of the truck.


The truck should start as
if you'd actually used the glow plugs. If the truck


still won't start, try
several more pots of water to heat the manifold further.





To test glow plugs, remove
the aluminum bus bar that connects them. With an


Ohm-meter, check
continuity of the plugs. If you detect an open circuit, the


glow plug is no good.
Glow plugs should be replaced as a set. If only one is


replaced, it will put an
unequal load on the others, causing them to burn out


more quickly





19.5 Owner's Manual Maintenance
Schedules - Toyota


---------------------------------------------------


These are from an owner's
manual. Although the manual was (C)Toyota, it


also contained the
instruction on the Table of Contents page:





Please leave this Owner'
Manual in this vehicle at the time of resale. The next


owner will need this
information also.





Probably 75% of the
original owners didn't follow the directions, so I'm going


to reprint this section.
It should also be noted that I don't agree with some


of the times given--they
should be considered as the MAXIMUM duration.





The year of the owner's
manual the information was taken from is indicated next


to the engine model in the
heading. E-mail me (RAMullen@wimsey.com) if your


owner's manual lists
different intervals.





Maintenance operations:


A - Check and/or adjust as
necessary


I - Inspect and correct or
replace as necessary


R - Replace, change, or
lubricate





19.5.1 Gas Powered Vehicles
(2F-1983)


-------------------------------------


SERVICE INTERVAL:
x1000mi 15 30 45 60



x1000km 24 48 72 96



months 12 24 36 48


BASIC ENGINE COMPONENTS


1 Valve Clearance
A A A A


2 Drive belts (1)
. I . I


3 Engine oil & filter
10000mi (16000km) or 8 months


4 Engine coolant (2)
. . . R


5 Cooling & heater
system hoses . . . I


& connections


6 Exhaust pipes &
mountings I I I I


FUEL SYSTEM


7 Idle speed & fast
idle speed (3) A . . .


8 Choke System
. I . I


9 Air Filter
. R . R


10 Fuel lines &
connections . I . I


11 Fuel tank cap gasket
. . . R


IGNITION SYSTEM


12 Spark plugs
. R . R


13 Ignition wiring
. I . I


EMISSIONS SYSTEMS


14 Charcoal cannister
. . . I


15 Fuel evaporative
emission control . . . I


CHASSIS & BODY


16 Clutch Pedal
I I I I


17 Brake pads & discs
I I I I


18 Brake linings &
drums I I I I


19 Brake lines & hoses
I I I I


20 Steering linkage
I I I I


21 Steering knuckle &
chassis grease R R R R


22 Propeller shaft grease
R R R R


23 Wheel bearing grease
. R . R


24 Transmission transfer &
diff. oil I I I I


25 Bolts & nuts on
chassis & body I I I I





(1) After 60000mi
(96000km) or 48mo, inspect every 15000mi (24000km) or 12mo


(2) After 60000mi
(96000km) or 48mo, replace every 30000mi (48000km) or 24mo


(3) After 30000mi
(48000km) or 24mo, adjustment is not necessary








19.5.2 Diesel Powered Vehicles
(B-1978)


---------------------------------------


SERVICE INTERVAL:
x1000mi 15 30 45 60



x1000km 12 24 36 48 60 72 84 96



months 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48


BASIC ENGINE COMPONENTS


1 Valve Clearance
. A . A . A . A


2 Drive belts
. I . R . I . R


3 Engine oil
3750mi (6000km) or 3 months


4 Engine oil filter
R R R R R R R R


5 Engine coolant (1)
. . . R . . . R


6 Cooling & heater
system hoses . I . I . I . I


& connections


7 Exhaust System
I I . I . I . I


FUEL SYSTEM


8 Idle speed &
maximum speed . A . A . A . A


9 Fuel filter
. R . R . R . R


10 Feed pump filter
. . . I . . . I


11 Injection pump governor
diaphragm . I . I . I . I


12 Injection timing &
nozzles . . . I . . . I


13 Air Filter
. I . R . I . R


14 Fuel tank cap, lines, &
connections . . . I . . . I


PREHEATING SYSTEM


15 Glow Plugs
. I . I . I . I


CHASSIS & BODY


16* Brake & clutch
pedal & parking brake I I I I I I I I


17 Brake linings &
drums I I I I I I I I


18 Brake pads & discs
I I I I I I I I


19 Brake lines &
hoses I I I I I I I I


20* Brake fluid level
I I I I I I I I


21 Vacuum pump oil hoses
. I . I . I . R


22 Steering box, linkage,
& gear box oil I I I I I I I I


23* Transmission transfer
& diff. oil I I I R I I I R


24 Wheel bearing grease
. . . R . . . R


25* Steering knuckle &
chassis grease R R R R R R R R


26* Propeller shaft grease
. R . R . R . R


27 Bolts & nuts on
chassis & body I I . I . I . I


28 Emergency locking
retractor system . I . I . I . I


29 Seat Belt Warning
System . I . I . I . I





Under severe driving
conditions, service interval should be shortened as shown


on the table below:





MAINTENANCE ITEM
OP INTERVAL UNDER CONDITIONS


Engine oil
R 3000km A,B,C,D,E


Engine oil filter
R 6000km A,B,C,D,E


Exhaust system
I 6000km A,B,C


Air filter
I 6000km D


Brake linings & drums
I 12000km A,B,C,D


Brake pads & discs
I 6000km A,B,C,D


Steering wheel, linkage
I 6000km C


& gearbox oil


Transmission transfer
R 24000km A,B


& differential oil


Steering knuckle &
chassis grease R 6000km C


Propeller shaft grease
R 12000km A,C


Bolts & nuts on
chassis & body I 12000km A,B,C





CONDITIONS


A: Pulling a Trailer


B: Driving primarily short
diantances


C: Driving on rough roads


D: Driving on dusty roads


E: Driving in extremely
cold weather








18.5.3 Diesel Powered Vehicles
(3B-1983)


----------------------------------------


SERVICE INTERVAL:
x1000mi 15 30 45 60



x1000km 24 48 72 96



months 12 24 36 48


BASIC ENGINE COMPONENTS


1 Valve Clearance
A A A A


2 Drive belts
I R I R


3 Engine oil
3750mi (6000km) or 3 months


4 Engine oil filter
7500mi (12000km) or 6 months


5 Engine coolant (1)
. . . R


6 Cooling & heater
system hoses . . . I


& connections


7 Vacuum pump oil hoses
I I I R


8 Exhaust pipes &
mountings I I I I


FUEL SYSTEM


9 Idle speed & fast
idle speed (2) A A . .


10 Fuel filter
. R . R


11 Feed pump filter
. I . I


12 Injection pump governor
diaphragm I I I I


13 Air Filter
. R . R


14 Fuel lines &
connections . I . I


15 Fuel tank cap gasket
. . . R


CHASSIS & BODY


16* Clutch Pedal
I I I I


17 Brake pads & discs
I I I I


18 Brake linings &
drums I I I I


19 Brake lines &
hoses I I I I


20 Steering linkage
I I I I


21* Steering knuckle &
chassis grease R R R R


22* Propeller shaft grease
R R R R


23 Wheel bearing grease
. R . R


24* Transmission transfer
& diff. oil I I I I


25 Bolts & nuts on
chassis & body I I I I





(1) After 60000mi
(96000km) or 48mo, inspect every 15000mi (24000km) or 12mo


(2) After 30000mi
(48000km) or 24mo, adjustment is not necessary





Whenever you drive
off-road through sand, mud, or water, check the following items as
soon as possible:





- Brake pads and discs


- Brake linings and drums


- Brake lines and hoses


- Steering linkage and
knuckles


- Transmission, transfer,
and differential oil


- Wheel bearings


- Propeller shafts








19.6 Ride Harshness - Rob Mullen
(RAMullen@wimsey.com)


------------------------------------------------------


Short wheel base trucks
ride rough and there is not a whole lot that can be


done about it. There are
a few options to soften the ride though. In order


of "Bang-For-The-Buck"
they are:





1. AVOID ADD-A-LEAFS!


These will make your
Cruiser ride like the axles are bolted directly to


the frame.





2. Keep lifts as small as
possible.


The higher up you are,
the more pitching motions of the truck are


amplified.





3. Use the right shocks.


Unless your truck is
equipped with some bizarre ultra-heavy-weight PTO


winch, stay away from
70-30 high-pressure gas shocks like KYB Gas-A-Justs.


They'll give a brutal
ride. Hydraulic shocks like the cheapest


Trailmasters, or
Rancho RS5000s are better, but their valvings still aren't


right. RS9000s give
you more valving range, but unless you're desert pre-


running, only settings
1-3 are really useful.





4. If you have the Rancho
2.5" 7 leaf Lift, you can improve the ride quality


by modifying the
spring wrappers. Rancho makes the wrappers too tight


for proper spring
movement. If you pry open the outermost sets of


wrappers, the ride
will become softer and your articulation will increase


by several inches.
The remaining three wrappers are sufficient to prevent


spring pack shifting.





5. If your truck is
lifted, you can soften the ride by removing one of the


short leaves.
Unfortunately, removing a leaf will also decrease ride


height and load
capacity.





6. Front shackle reversal


See the section on
shackle reversals.





7. Polyurethane
Bushings/Greasable Shackles


Adding polyurethane
bushings will not soften the ride but will improve


handling by preventing
the springs from twisting relative to the mounts.


Polyurethane is also
required for greasable shackles because dino-based


grease will break down
rubber bushings quickly. Using after-market


shackles will further
improve handling by resisting shackle twisting,


while greasable pins
allow the springs to move more freely to absorb


bumps.





19.7 Saginaw Power Steering
Conversion-Park Owens (rokcrwlr@rapidnet.com)


-------------------------------------------------------------------------


The parts for a Land
Cruiser power steering mod the way I did it include:





4 turn/4 bolt box from a
salvage yard


Potential Donors:


Buick LeSabre '65-68


Buick Special '64-69


Camaro '67-74


Chev Passenger '65-70


Chevelle '64-69


Firebird '67-70


Grand Prix '70


Nova '68-69


Olds Jetstar 88 '64-66


Olds F85 '64-69


Pontiac Catalina,
Ventura & 2+2 (w/o air) '67-68


Pontiac Catalina and
Ventura (w/o air) '69-70


Tempest '64-69


pump; reman or salvage
yard


(2) #5-103X U-joints
(Spicer)


(2) #10-4-13 End Yokes
(Spicer)


(1) #10-3-13X Slip Yoke
(Spicer)


(1) #10-4-501SX Steering
Yoke (Spicer)


(3) feet of 3/16"
key shaft


(3) pieces of 3/16"
key stock


(1) #FWG34R Pillow Block
(Federal-Mogul)


(1) Dropped Pitman Arm


(1) Tie Rod


(1) Tie Rod End


(2) Custom hoses





When you remove the
current drag link and center pivot steering assembly, you


can cut the drag link to
26 inches, re-thread, and use for new tie rod between


new pitman arm and
existing Cruiser steering tie rod.





If you or anyone else
would like a copy of the templates I used to enclose the


front frame rails on both
the passenger and driver's side, please send a SASE


envelope to me at:





Dakota Territory Cruisers


P O Box 2238


Rapid City, SD 57709





Notes: A three inch
diameter hole will need to be cut/drilled through the cross


member under the radiator
on the driver's side...does not weaken it in any way.


You'll also need some
spacers made of gas pipe to put in the frame rail before


you enclose it to keep it
from being crushed when you tighten down the ps box.


Also, if you get a 4 bolt
box, you do not need any additional support for the ps


box to the passenger side
frame rail.





19.8 Shackle Reversals-Rob Mullen
(RAMullen@wimsey.com)


-------------------------------------------------------


There are essentially two
schools of design when it comes to Shackle reversals.


The first is a bolt-on kit
that involves some kind of drop bracket at the front


of the frame and shackle
hangers that bolt on below the frame. The second is


more involved and results
on the front perch being mounted directly below the


frame, the shackle hanger
being recessed into the frame, and the knuckles cut


and welded to correct
caster angles.





Why go to all that
trouble? In an effort to improve the high-speed on-road


handling of FJ40s. There
are two principals that help improve the handling of


a vehicle with reversed
shackles.





On a vehicle with the
shackles at the front of the front springs as the spring


compresses vertically, the
axle moves forwards. That means that as a tire hits


an obstacle, the spring
tries to push the tire forwards, harder into the


obstacle. With the
shackles at the back of the springs, when the tire hits an


obstacle, the springs
compress and the axle is essentially allowed to pivot up


and backwards away from
the obstacle. That action results in a less jarring


ride. This action is only
really noticeable at non-low range type speeds, that


is, it makes no difference
to rock crawling type activities.





The second effect of
reversing the shackles is that the momentum of the truck


pulls the springs, rather
than pushing them. The effect is minimized with


perfect bushings and
shackles, but any wear in the bushings will result in the


shackles rocking side-side
which the axle housing to yaw slightly which leads to


vague handling. With the
shackles on the rear of the springs, the shackles are


forced to follow the axle
housing, instead of vice versa, so wear is not as much


of a factor.





There are some drawbacks
with reversing the shackles though. If the axle was


left in the stock position
and the driveshaft was left the stock length, when


the springs compressed,
the axle would move backwards, the splines in the slip


joint would bottom out,
and the output shaft of the transfer case would be


punched out the back. To
avoid this nasty mess, most shackle reversals either


move the axle forwards, or
require that the front driveshaft be shortened. The


problem with simply
pulling the slip joint further apart to make up for the


increased movement of the
axle is less engagement of the splines of the


driveshaft. That will
accelerate spline wear. Diesels naturally tend to wear


out front driveshafts
faster, either due to the vibration, or because of blow-


by tube oil discharge
diluting the grease. Spline life can be maximized by


religious greasing of the
slip joint, but it will never equal that of a stock-


suspension geometry
vehicle.





There are essentially two
styles of shackle reversals available: One designed


by Land Cruiser Advanced
Handling and manufactured by BTB, and a similar kit


from Renegade Fabrication,
and the other offered by Warden's Auto Repair and


FabTech. I'll refer to
the former as a "high" reversal and the latter as a


"low" reversal
for reasons that should become apparent. Both styles have


advantages and
disadvantages. BTB will soon be introducing a third kind of


reversal that is
essentially a hybrid of the two styles and will probably be the


best option.





The high reversal is
basically a bolt-on kit (although it can be welded) It


consists of two
approximately 7" "towers" that attach to the front of
the frame


horns and that serve as
the fixed point for the springs, hangers that bolt to


the underside of the frame
near where the fixed perches used to reside, and


spacers for the bump
stops.





The large "towers"
are required to maintain proper caster angle


despite the fact that the
perches are slung under the frame. If the towers


were shorter, there would
be excessive caster and the vehicle would be


undriveable. The large
towers and perches under the frame effectively lift the


front of the vehicle 1.5"
relative to the rear of the vehicle. The combination


of moving the springs down
from the frame, and dropping the bump-stops serve to


prevent the driveshaft's
slip joints from bottoming out. The main advantage of


the high reversal is that
a competant back-yard mechanic can undertake with


less risk of damaging the
handling of the vehicle. The main disadvantage of


the kit is the towers.
They decrease the approach angle slightly compared to


the stock shackles.





One effect is a bit of a
mixed blessing. If a stock truck smacks the front


spring eye/shackle hard
into a rock, a bent or broken spring will result


because the spring is
being compressed axially to failure. With the high


reversal, if the tower is
smacked into a rock, the spring will not be affected,


but it is possible for the
unboxed passenger's side framehorn to buckle.





The Advanced
Handling/Current BTB and Renegade kits have some key differences.
The


former retains the springs
in the stock direction. The latter flips the springs


around so the military
wraps are at the front, which is superior for a couple


reasons. It means that
the towers don't have to angle as far forwards to move


the axle, which gives a
slightly better approach angle. The towers also don't


have to be quite as low
because the military-wrapped eye of the spring actually


comes up higher than the
un-wrapped eye. Unfortunately, the Renegade kit also


requires 4 degree shims.





The low reversal should
only be attempted by professionals. I think there only


three shops that are
currently doing it: BTB, FabTech, and Warden's Automotive.


It is usually done as part
of a spring-over conversion. With this reversal, the


stock fixed spring perchs
are relocated to the front of the frame horns. A hole


is cut through the frame,
and the tube for the shackle is welded in place. The


allignment of the spring
attachment points rotates the leading edge of the


springs upwards, and if
used with a stock axle housing would lead to excessive


caster. To ensure proper
caster, the knuckles on the axle housing are cut off,


rotated, and re-welded. A
properly done spring-over conversion also requires


the knuckles to be rotated
to tip the pinion up, so two problems are solved at


once. Even with a
spring-under configuration, this style of reversal greatly


improves the approach
angle.





19.9 Silicon Clutch Diagnosis-John
Barron (jbarron@uvic.ca)


-----------------------------------------------------------


Here is a test sequence
for the fan. Apparently it is possible to replace


the fluid in the fan
clutch if the old has leaked out. It is a silicone


oil/silicone based product
from what I have been told, and is avaialable


from Toyota AFAIK. There
is a small valve inside the fan-clutch housing


that opens by way of the
thermostatic (bimetal) coil on the front of the


housing. If the
thermostatic coil is dead then ou will have to replace the


whole unit or rob the part
([if it's even possible] from a wrecking yard


unit). There is also a
bearing in the clutch itself and that can wear out


so beware.





The viscous coupled fan on
Toyota pick-ups and LCs will often change its


sound as it engages and
disengages. It will go from a gentle "whirrring"


sound to a really loud
"roar." Often the loud roar of the fan is noticeable


for a few moments just
after the engine has been started and then it


quietens down
considerably. This is *normal*.





The fan on my LC almost
never engages and so I don't often hear the roaring


noise BUT the fan on my
GF's pick-up (2L-T) does engage willingly and roars


like crazy when the engine
is running a little hotter than normal (ie:


towing monstrous trailers
up mountains in the summer)...the sound is always


associated with a very
prompt drop in the operating temperature of the


engine down to the low
side of normal--at which point the noise subsides.





You can check the fan
clutch operation by spinning [by hand] the fan when


the engine is cold [and
OFF]: it should spin about 1/3 to 1/2 a turn or so


and then stop [sometimes a
bit more]. There should be a bit of resistance


to the movement. If the
engine has just been run and is [a little] warm the


fan will spin quite
freely--this is okay. If the engine is really


*screaming hot* AND there
has been good flow of air over the radiator then


the fan clutch *may* be
engaged and should provide a decent amount of


resistance to spinning.





There are no really
definitive tests for this procedure AFAIK.





[Please note: the
repeating the test sequence too many times in quick


succession will cause the
fan to spin more and more freely as you "test"


it.]





If your fan doesn't ever
engage [no roar] and your engine runs hot you may


have either: a defective
fan clutch OR a blocked radiator OR a defective


thermostat OR a
combination of these three problems. The fan clutch needs


hot air flow over the rad
to engage...





To check rad performance
[in your back yard] you can drive until your


vehicle has reached normal
operating temperature and then mist the rad with


water. If all the water
evaporates then the rad is probably alright [as in


not blocked]. If there are
areas where the water evaporates and others


where it doesn't [cold
spots, usually vertical sections of the rad] then


the rad needs to be
serviced [power flushed or rodded-out]. You can also


check for cold spots by
using your hand but there is often not a lot of


space between the grille
and the rad --> and you could burn your hand. Be


careful.





A rad shop can remove your
radiator and check the flow for you if you think


that it's blocked.





A sticking/dead thermostat
will also cause the engine temperature to be


higher than normal --this
is another issue-- but it will also prevent the


fan clutch from doing its
job as very little hot coolant will be entering


the radiator and no hot
air will be passing over the fan....Your interior


heater will be really hot
[when temp set on high] and your rad cool-ish if


this is the
situation...replace the thermostat with a new one that is right


for the climate where you
live.





Lastly: if the fan clutch
is screwed you may be able to see the silicon


fluid leaking from the
clutch housing...then again, maybe not. A very few


clutch fans I have seen
are permanently engaged [jammed inside, bad bearing


etc...]. In any of these
situations you need to replace it. See your local


Auto-Wrecker, Auto Parts
store or Toyota parts person.





19.10 Steering Wandering-Rob Mullen
(RAMullen@wimsey.com)


--------------------------------------------------------


There are four basic
components in the 40 series steering system that can wear


out/go out of adjustment
and cause steering slop/wandering. They are the tie


rod ends, drag link end,
centre arm, and steering box.





A small amount of play in
each of the tie rod ends can add up to a huge amount


of steering slop. The
only way tie rods should be able to be moved by hand is


to rotate slightly on an
axis that runs through the ball joints at each end of


the rod. Even this motion
should feel "snug." If the tie rod can be moved in


any other direction the
ball joints are probably worn and should be replaced.





The drag link connects to
the pitman arm that comes off the steering box. If


the link can be moved in a
fore-aft motion without the pitman arm moving, the


end is out of adjustment.
The adjustment procedure is fairly simple. Remove


the cotter pin, and with a
very large slot screwdriver tighten the end plug as


far as you can, then back
it out 1/2 turn. Finally, put in a new cotter pin.





The centre arm probably
accounts for most 40 series steering problems. It is


located on the drivers
side in front of the front frame crossmember. To test


if your centre arm is worn
or needs adjustment, have someone turn the


steering wheel back and
forth while you stand in front of your truck. The


centre arm shaft should
only rotate about a vertical axis and not twist


side-side. If the shaft
twists, it may only be out of adjustment. To adjust


it, loosen the lock bolt
on top of the centre arm. Next remove the top cap.


Check inside the arm for
grease. If there is none, chances are you centre arm


is scrap, but it's worth
packing it and re-testing it anyways before you blow


$100 on a re-build kit.
Once you've filled the housing with grease, replace


the top cap. Tighten it
down as far as you can then back it of 1/4 turn.


Then tighten the locking
bolt. Finally, repeat the steering wheel turn test.


If the shaft still twists,
you need a re-build.





The 40 series manual
steering box will only fail to outlive you if one of two


things happen: it's run
without oil, or its not adjusted periodically. The


only way for the oil to
get out is if the sector shaft seal fails. Should


this happen, you can limp
home by packing the housing with grease until you have


time to replace the seal.
Adjustment of the steering box should only be


attempted after reading
the Toyota Steering or Body/Chassis manual.





If you are running larger
than stock tires, you will need a larger than stock


steering dampener to stop
wandering. IMHO, the Old Man Emu stabilizer is the


way to go. It is a VERY
sturdy bolt-in replacement for the stock stabilizer.


The other alternative is
to get something like the Rancho kit or Heckthorn


"Big Yellow"
which require adding brackets to the axle and tie rod. I believe


the OME unit is superior
because it puts the stabilizer higher up where it is


less likely to be smacked
by rocks or submerged in water, it doesn't introduce


any strange off-axis
forces in the tie rods and it doesn't require the cheezy


clamp-on brackets.





Steering can also be
improved by using polyurethane bushings/aftermarket


shackles as detailed in
the section on Ride Harshness.





19.11 Spring Over Conversions-John
Barron (John_Barron@bc.sympatico.ca)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------


Reverse, completely, your
front leaves. No drilling, military wrap at the


front. Spring in proper
orientation.





Put the spring bushing
eyes into the frame at the back and at the rear of


the front. You will have
to carefully line the front ones up as the frame


is not parallel to the
centreline of the rig there.





Box in the rear frame
where the spring bushing eyes are going to go with


3/16" plate.





Box in the right front
frame horn with 3/16" plate and brace the corner a


bit where it joins with
the first front cross member. Lots of stress here.





The front *differential
flange* should sit at about 10 to 12 degrees after


you have turned the ball
ends. The caster ahould be set to 4 degrees. As it


is now the diff flange is
at about 3 deg (give or take) and the balls at


about 1 degree (give or
take) compared to the perches. SO this means that


the ball ends should be
turned about 12 degrees total (adding 3 deg caster


and turning the diff up to
12 deg by adding 9 degrees of rotation).





Be careful to turn the
knuckle balls without knocking them sideways or you


might affect the camber a
bit. I used a large heavy pipe through the king


pin bearing holes and
tapped it around with a hammer--the pipe applied


pressure to both ends of
the ball at once and should not have messed up the


caster.





You should use a double
cardan rear and front joint although you can get


away without it if you're
careful and only using the front drive at lower


speeds.





If you're careful you will
get about 4" lift over where you are now (going


up by SPOA and down by the
recessing of the bushing eyes). This is not too


much in the big picture
and it gives you the advantage of the SPOA.





One more thing...the rear
springs are often re-drilled so that the rear


axle is located rearward
1.5". This is not necessary if you get a set of


FJ60 series front springs
and use them at the rear instead. Just take a few


measurements to be sure
that this will work. And you will need OME big


bushing to small bolt type
(if your rig is before 1981) to fit the 60


series springs.





Okay, yes they are welded
on to the axle ends but it is not a butt weld.


The balls are sleeved into
the axle housing about two inches. The trick is


to cut the welds out or
cut *just* next to the welds and then turn the


knuckle ends.





Start with a stripped-down
and clean axle housing. Then remove the shock


mounts, the steering stop
flanges, and the brake line brackets if they are


in the way. What I then
did was to take a hose clamp and place it up to the


ball end as close to the
weld as possible, I used this as a guide to scribe


a line right next to the
weld. I then took my 4.5" angle grinder with a


cutting wheel (about 1/8"
thick or so) and I carefully cut into the axle


tube about 3/16" to
1/4" deep around the scribed line. I knew just how deep


to go because I could see
the difference in the metals and a very faint


oily line where the
knuckle ball and the tube meet. Make sure that your cut


is complete all the way
around and that you haven't either gone too deep or


that you missed an area. I
then checked to see that I had made a complete


cut by gently tapping on
the ball with a hammer to move the ball out about


1 or 2 thousandths of an
inch. I then ground the welds around the ball


smooth along an inch or
two of circumference and polished them up with a


sanding disc.





From here I made a little
calculation to see how many millimetres I would


need to turn the balls
around the circumference to get the number of


degrees I needed. I found
the axle that I was using to be about 80mm in dia


so I calculated X number
of mm around the circumference is Y degrees. I


then carefully scribed a
very faint straight line along the axle tube and


the ball and another line
on the axle tube to where I wanted the ball to be


once the desired amount of
turning had been achieved I then punched the


lines with a very fine
sharp punch to be sure they stayed. I then took a


piece of 3.5' by about
1.5" dia tube and put it through the two king pin


bearing holes and gently
applied pressure as I tapped the tube with a


hammer to rotate the
balls. Once the scribed lines lined up I re-did my


measurements and checkd to
see if the amount of turning was correct. A few


taps later it was perfect.
I then double checked the angles with an angle


finder and saw that I was
right to about 1/4 of a degree (the accuracy of


the angle finder).





C=(pi)(dia)


X= (3.14159265)(80)


X=251.3274mm





360degrees/251.3274mm=
1.432394 degrees/mm





251.3274mm/360degrees=
0.6981317 mm/degree





so 12 degrees required
turning is (12)(0.6981317mm)= 8.37758mm around the


circumference





The tires, if you are
going to go above 33", like to 35s, will rub on the


front portion of the rear
wheel well. Moving the axle back eliminates this


trouble and is also good
as it makes the rear shaft a little longer thereby


slightly decreasing the
operating angle of the driveshaft.





19.12 Transmission and Transfer
Removal Tips-Rob Mullen (RAMullen@wimsey.com)


----------------------------------------------------------------------------


The transmission and
transfer case should be removed as a unit, even if you


only need to remove the
transfer case. The transmission will separate easily


from the bellhousing
whereas separating the transfer case from the


transmission usually
requires a puller. Removing the transmission also allows


you to inspect the clutch
and pilot bearing.





Save your old large-eye
rubber spring bushings. They are great for removing


the shifter from your
manual transmission. Instead of using two screwdrivers


to push and twist (and
scratch) the shift lever cap, use the bushing. First,


remove the ball at the end
of the shifter. Slide the bushing (narrow end


down) to the base of the
shifter. Then slide a 19mm or larger box end wrench


(or the end of a large
crescent wrench) down the shifter. Clamp a set of


Vise-Grips on to the
bushing tight enough to twist it, but not so tight as to


clamp it to the shifter.
Then while pushing down HARD on the box-end wrench,


twist the Vise-Grips
clockwise. The shift lever cap should pop right off.





The pilot bearing should
be replaced every time you remove the transmission as


it is an inexpensive part
that can cause major headaches if it fails. The


easiest way to remove the
pilot bearing is by making your own "hydraulic


cylinder." This is
much easier than it sounds. Simply push grease through the


central hole in the
bearing until the cavity behind it is filled. Then push a


cylindrical object that
isn't too much larger than the inner diameter of the


bearing into the hole.
The grease that is displaced should pop the bearing out.





Putting the tranny back in
is a tiresome process. An engine hoist is


essential if you want to
preserve your sanity. Jacking the tranny/transfer


assmebly from below is
virtually impossible. You should buy 3 M12x60x1.25 or so


bolts to help you allign
the transmission. Manouver the tranny into position so


that the input shaft is
through the throw-out bearing and at least one of the


tranny-bellhousing holes
is alligned (the lower passenger side one is a good


place to start) Thread
one of the longer M12 bolts through the tranny and into


the bellhousing (be sure
there's alot of thread going into the bellhousing so it


won't tear out if it has
to take some of the tranny's weight. Next, rotate the


tranny about the bolt
until another hole is alligned. Pop in another of your


M12 bolts in. You may
have to level the tranny a little before you can get the


last bolt in. (Put it on
the passenger's side--it's easier to remove) You


should then be able to
walk the tranny along the bolts until its right up snug


with the bellhousing. It
may take a little push to close the final 1/4" gap.


If there is resistance
before this point, chances are the tranny's input shaft


is not going through the
pilot bearing properly. BE CAREFUL. If you crush the


pilot bearing, you'll have
to repeat the whole removal/installation process!


Once the tranny is in
position, put one of the stock length bolts into the


driver's side top hole.
Finally, remove the allignment bolts one by one and


install the stock bolts.





19.13 V8J40 Cooling Tips - Fred
Welland (fwelland@prcrs.prc.com)


-----------------------------------------------------------------


CONTRIBUTORS ENGINE
FAN RAD USUAL TEMP


Fred Welland 350 (400)
7 BLADE AIRCO 2F 190-230


Karl Klashinsky 350
Electric 5/6 CORE 200-210


Mike Bennett 350
5-CORE X-FLO 200-210


Mike Sousa 350
7 BLADE CADDY 4-CORE 185-200





TEMPERATURE RANGES


The ideal maximum
temperature for a SB Chevy in a Land Cruiser is 200 degrees


Fahrenheit. The maximum
allowable is probably in the 230-240 range.





FAN TYPES


Flex fans are generally
regarded as the poorest type for extreme cooling.


Clutch fans are the next
worst


Electrical fans are the
next. They have two advantages: the ablility to be


manually shut off during
water crossings to prevent splashing, and greater fuel


economy. However, a
single electrical fan does not move enough air--a dual fan


push-pull arrangement may
be better though.


It is generally agreed
that some type of fixed pitch fan with many deep blades


is the best. It will move
the greatest amount of air, however, it will provide


your truck with DC-3 on
takeoff roll sound-effects and will function as an


excellent screw in water
crossings. Some sources of thes monster props are air


conditioning suppliers and
Cadillacs.





WATER PUMPS & HOSES


A high flow water pump can
be good for as much as a 10 degree temperature drop.





For extreme temperature
duty, molded hoses tend to be more rupture-resistant


than flexible ones.





TEMPERATURE SENDER
PLACEMENT


In most cases, the sender
is located on the side of the block between cylinders 1 and 2.





LOWERING STOCK RADIATOR


Piece of cake. I hoped I
could just slide the radiator down in the u-shaped


channel and drill some new
holes. Nope, I couldn't get the radiator down


enough: you might be able
to. If not, take out the radiator and u-shaped


mount. The radiator
mounts to the u-shaped mount and the u-shaped mount sits


on two brackets extending
back from the front crossmember. Figure out where


you want the radiator to
sit (fore and aft) and then cut off enough of the


existing brackets so the
radiator and mount will move straight down. Figure


out how low you want the
radiator to sit and then weld two pieces of angle


iron to the ends of the
brackets to make a new lower shelf for the u-shaped


mount to sit on.




old mount: |__________
new mount: |______


|__________|
|______|


|
| |___




When I got my radiator low
enough, the corner of my u-shaped mount wanted to


occupy the same space as
my steering column shaft. I chopped a section out of


the u-shaped mount for
clearance around the steering shaft and just reinforced


the inside of the mount
with another small piece of steel. Looks funny, but


it works. Bend, cut,
weld, or something so you can reattach the side braces


and your down the road!





FAN SHROUDS


Some claim that a fan
shoud makes all the differnce in the world, however some


there are also those that
say installing a shroud had no effect.





OIL COOLERS


Adding an oil cooler
should make a difference in your engine temperature because


theoretically you now have
two paths for heat to leave the engine. Adding an


oil cooler has the
advantage of increasing your oil capacity (although it will


cost you more for an oil
change)











> Water Wetter is
available from any Super Shops. It's $6.95/bottle. If they


> don't have it in
stock they will order it for you.





Water Wetter is made by
Redline. You can order it directly from them at


1-800-624-7958 if you
can't find it locally. However, it may be subject


to a minimum order. It
works.





19.14 Which Wheels Work? - Rob
Mullen (RAMullen@wimsey.com)


===========================================================


There are essentially four
"periods" to consider when looking at which wheels


your Land Cruiser will
accept. They are: Early-75 drum brakes, 76-89


disc/finned drum brakes,
90-91 disc brakes, and finally 92+ four-wheel disc


brakes.





With the first two
"periods", the ABSOLUTE maximum backspacing is 3.75"
With


that backspacing, chances
are good that wheel weights that snap onto the lip of


the rim (as opposed to
sticking to the inboard/outboard faces) will rub on the


tie rod ends--especially
with 60 and 70 series.





The IDEAL backspacing is
3.5"--that will give you lots of clearance.





Early drum brakes are
relatively easy to fit wheels wheel to along as the


backspacing is correct.





With disc brakes (as used
on the 40, 60, and 70 series) and finned drum brakes


(as used on the 45 series)
even if you find a wheel with the right backspacing,


there is still a chance it
will not work. This is more of a problem with 16"


rims than 15". The
problem is a result of the cross-section of the "disc" of


the rim. The followin
will sort of illustrate the problem:





|___| |___|


\ \


) \


| AXLE | AXLE


| HUB | HUB


) /


_/_ _/_


| | | |





On disc-brake equipped
trucks, the rounded "indent" of the rim on the left will


hit the calliper, while
the rim on the right will clear the calliper. On


vehicles equipped with
finned drum brakes, the profile of the trum is such that


the rounded indent will
push against the drum before the studs are fully


tightened.





Rims that do not clear
will require wheel spacers, of which there are two


varieties.





The first tend to be
relatively cheap, are made from cast pot-metal


or aluminum, and tend to
be about 1/4" thick. They are standard equipment on


vehicles of the DEVIL!
They are EVIL and will bring much unhappiness to you,


your family, and all
future generations bearing your name. They are totally


incapable of withstanding
the forces generated by off-road driving.





The second type are much
heavier duty. They're usually machined aluminum or


steel, and are closer to
1" thick. They bolt onto your hubs, then have a set of


their own studs that
alternate with the stock ones. The rims are actually


bolted to the spacers
themselves, and not to the vehicle's hub.





The following rims
DEFINITELY work on all drum and pre-89 disc brake equipped


trucks:





Brazilian made 16x7"
Mangels Series 10s (3.54" backspacing--3.75" backspacing


is a tight fit)


Brazilian made 16x7"
Mangels Series 90s (not sure what the backspacing is rated


as, but is actually ~3")


Note that all steel
Mangels sold in North America are now made in the US and WILL


NOT fit.


15" Eaton Monster
Wheels (3" backspacing)


15x8" Superior White
Spoke Wheels (3.5" backspacing)


15x8 American Eagle 589s
(backspacing-3.5?)





The following rims
DEFINITELY DO NOT work:





Any American Racing 16"


ANY Canadian Superior 16"


Alcoa/Mickey Thompson
Classic/Challenger 16"


US made Mangels in the
plain white boxes


8-spoke Toyota aluminum
wheels from pre-91 80 Series Land Cruisers, and


86+ Pickups/4Runners





I've also heard that
American Racing has changed the design of their rims so


most of their 15s don't
fit.





I'd appreciate it if
people could tell me what works on their trucks with


LC/Hilux disc-brake
equipped axles (fit isn't nearly as much of an issue


with drum brake equipped
trucks)





In 1989, the design of the
hub was changed to be more like that of the Hilux.


That meant that up to 4"
of back-spacing was permissable. Since the mating


surface of the hub was
moved further outboard, calliper clearance was not as


much of an issue.





In 1992, the wheel size of
LCs was changed to 16" that was to allow adequate


clearance between the rims
and the rear disc brakes. Fitting 15" wheels to a


>1992 truck equipped
with rear disc brakes requires grinding a little off the


callipers.





20.0 Land Cruiser Clubs


=======================





20.1 North America


------------------


Toyota Land Cruiser
Association (TLCA)


PO Box 607


Placerville, CA 95667-0607


Kara Patston (Membership):
KPatston@aol.com


Gary Bjork (Toyota Trails
Editor): TLCAEditor@aol.com


Membership
Services:1(800)397-3260 24hr voice/fax





Chapters:


This information (esp.
Contacts and Phone #'s) may change fairly regularly,


contact TLCA for more
info.





Basin & Range Cruisers


1639 East 4500 South


Salt Lake City, UT 84124


Contact: Jack Christensen


(801)277-6629





Beach'N'Toys


405 S Rose St.


Escondido, CA 92027


Contact: Brad Phillips


(619)747-1822





Capital Land Cruiser Club


45655C Woodland Rd.


Sterling, VA 20166


Contact: James Asti


(703)404-8115





Cascade Cruisers


10045 S. Marquam Circle


Molalla, OR 97038


Contact: Peter Poling


(503)642-9164





Coastal Cruisers


2360 Douglas Road


Burnaby, B.C.


Canada


V5C 5B2


Contact: Dave Romaniuk


(604)299-5600


E-contact: Rob Mullen


RAMullen@wimsey.com





Gold Coast Cruisers


761 Coronado Pl.


Oxnard, CA 93030


Contact: Lary Moczulski


(805)984-3309





Georgia Cruisers


PO Box 467691


Atlanta, GA 31146


Contact: Steve Clevenger


(404)446-9115





High-N-Dry Four Wheelers


9432 E. Ave. T-10


Littlerock, CA 93543


Contact: Mike Greear


(805)944-3881





Keystone Cruisers, TLCA of
PA


1063 E. Caracas


Hershey, PA 17033


Contact: Ken Johannsen


KJohannsen@aol.com





Massachusetts Coastal
Transit Authority


3 Federal St.


Newburyport, MA 01950


Contact: Tedd Brown


(508)465-6021





Mid-Ohio Land Cruisers


1791 E. Orange Rd.


Lewis Center, OH 43035


Contact: Bill Scott


(614)548-6214





Mountain Transit Authority


PO Box 54024


San Jose, CA 95154


Contact: Bill Youngman


(408)629-0949


billfj4045@aol.com





Nor-Cal Marauders


13880 Noble Way


Red Bluff, CA 96080


Contact: Jim Bosman


(916)527-4129





Rising Sun 4 Wheel Drive
Club of Colorado


4125 S. Lisbon Way


Aurora, CO 80013


Contact: Chris Hatfield


(303)680-1292


Toy4x4s@aol.com





Southeast Land Cruiser
Association


208 Reidhurst Ave.


Nashville, TN 37203


Contact: Rainey Kirk


(615)320-0129





Southern Nevada Land
Cruisers


PO Box 28004


Las Vegas, NV 89126


Contact: David Hawkins


(702)452-8471





So. Cal. TLCA


PO Box 1291


Sunset Beach, CA 90742


Contact: Ed Bailey


(714)841-9944





Totally Landcruisers of
New Jersey


PO Box 114


Eatontown, NJ 07724


Contact: Al Kaplan


(908)458-3413





TLCA Los Angeles County


1849 Lucretia Ave.


Los Angeles, CA 90026


Contact: Bill Ferguson


(213)250-4179





TLCA Ventura County
(founding chapter)


PO Box 367


Ventura, CA 93002


Contact: Michelle Bolton


(805)647-5263





Toyotally Awesome Cruisers
of Auburn


PO Box 5482


Auburn, CA 95604


Contact: Marty Patton


(916)268-9312


E-Contact: Jeff Hassi


JHassi@aol.com





Toys 4 Fun


PO Box 4086


Fresno, CA 93744


Contact: Chuck Parks


(209)432-9468





Toys on the Rocks


PO Box 546


Placerville, CA 95667


Contact: Jerry Schroeder


(916)642-0303





Virginia Land Cruiser
Association


205 Bayview Dr.


Yorktown, VA 23692


Contact: Bill Baxter


(804)877-9136





Washington Timber Toys


PO Box 2963


Woodinville, WA 98072-2963


Contact: Gordon Quehrn


(206)483-3531





Windy City Land Cruisers


4741 Montgomery Ave.


Downers Grove, IL 60515


Contact: Jim Today


(708)968-7820





20.2 Australia


--------------


Toyota Landcruiser Club of
Australia (Victoria) Inc.


PO Box 363


Hawthorn, Vic 3122





Toyota Landcruiser Club of
Australia (SA) Inc.


PO Box 55


Oaklands Park, SA 5046





Toyota LandCruiser Club of
Queensland Inc.


PO Box 8309


Wooloongabba, Qld 4102


bg@data3.com.au


http://www.sofcom.com.au/4WD/Clubs/Au/Qld/TLC.html





Toyota Landcruiser Club of
Vic, Geelong Branch


PO Box 515


Geelong, Vic 3220





Toyota LandCruiser Club
(NSW)


PO Box 2


Bankstown, NSW 2200


rains@ozemail.com.au





Toyota LandCruiser Club of
W.A.


P.O. Box 518


Cloverdale, W.A. 6105








20.3 Netherlands


----------------


Toyota Landcruiser Club
The Netherlands


c/o Jos Coppes


Albionstraat 12


5809 AD Leunen


the Netherlands


phone: 0478-512935 (day)


and: 0478-583290
(evenings)








21.0 Parts Suppliers


====================


Legend


N New Parts


U Used Parts


C Catalog Available


S Service or Custom
Work


V Complete Vehicles


* Specialty Products





21.1 North America


------------------


Advance Adapters, Inc.


N,C
Engine/Transmission/TC Adapters


PO Box 247


Paso Robles, CA 93447


(805)238-7000 FAX
(805)238-4201


www.advanceadapter.com


sales@advanceadapter.com





Advanced Four Wheel Drive
Systems


S


1102 South 200 West


Salt Lake City, UT 84101


(801)521-2334 FAX
(801)521-2335





All American Enterprises
4x4


4830 N. Hwy 97


Klamath Falls, OR 97601


(541)882-5313





Aqualu Industries


3251-A Sexsmith Road


Kelowna, BC Canada


(604) 765-6714 FAX
(604)765-6704





ARB-U.S.A.*


Air Lockers, ARB
bumpers,


1425 Elliott Ave. W
Old Man Emu Springs, Shackles


Seattle, WA 98119


(206)284-5906 FAX
(206)284-6171


arbusa@halcyon.com





Brown's Toyota City


N
New parts at wholesale


7167 Ritchie Hwy.


Glen Burnie, MD 21061


1-800-848-4451





BTB Products


N,U,M,S
Adv. Adapters, PS Conv, Compressors


825 Civic Center Dr. #8
Springs, Disc Conv, Cages, Tire Racks


Santa Clara, CA 95050


(408)984-5444 FAX
(408)984-0155


btbprod@btbprod.com


http://www.btbprod.com/Home.html





Clifford Performance


N,C
6-1 Headers, camshafts, EFI kits


2330 Pomona-Rincon Rd.


Corona, CA 91720


(714)734-3310
(714)734-3405





Colorado Toyota
Specialists


26366 Sutton Rd.


Conifer, CO 80433


(303)838-4772





Con-Ferr


N,C
Bumpers, Skid Plates, Shackles, Diff


123 South Front St., Dept.
FW0495 Skids, Roof Racks, Storage Boxes


Burbank, CA 91502-1983


(213)849-1800,
(818)848-2025,2330,6993


FAX(818)848-1011





"Cool Cruisers"
of Texas


V,N
Sells Restored Land Cruisers, Body


101 - 5101 Grisham Drive
Panels, Bolt-on Air Conditioning


Rowlett (Dallas Suburb),
TX 75243 **NO CATALOGS OR OTHER PARTS


(214)707-8993 FAX
(972)303-4600 AVAILABLE**


coolfj40@gte.net


http://www.coolcruisers.com





Cruiser Parts


2659 Williams Hwy


Grants Pass, OR 97257


(541) 479-5500





Desert Toyota


N
New Toyota Parts


7150 East 22nd Street


Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. 85710


(520)296-8535 FAX
(520)790-2900


spiketgr@aol.com





Downey Off-Road
Manufacturing


N,C,M
Tanks, Bumpers, Cams, Adapters,


10001 S. Pioneer Blvd.
Clutches, Dietributors, Tops, Diffs


Santa Fe Springs, CA 90670


(213)949-9494 FAX
(213)949-5718





FabTech Manufacturing &
Off Road, Inc.


N,U,S,C
14ga Steel Tubs, Fenders, PS


#9 - 150 Campion Rd.
Conversions, Restored LC's,


Kelowna, B.C.
Shackle Reversal


Canada V1V 1L9


(604)765-0019 FAX
(604)765-1419


http://shop.info-tec.com/fabtech/


fabtech@info-tec.com





Front Range Cruisers


N,U
Buy/Sell/Trade


2406 North Logan Ave.


Colorado Springs, CO.
80907


(719)633-8178 FAX
(719)475-7609


Grimes@pcisys.net





Hadley Industries


U,V,N,S,D


4785 Pratt


Metamora, MI 48455


(810)797-4120





Interior Auto Wrecking


U, V
Used FJ/BJ/HJ Parts


3101 45th Ave.


Vernon, B.C.


Canada V1T 3N7


(604)545-2104 FAX
(604)542-3335





James Toyota


172 Route 202


Flemington, NJ 08822


(908)788-5700 FAX
(908)788-7887


info@toyotaoutlet.com


http://www.toyotaoutlet.com





Jim's Fuel Injection
Service


N
Diesel injector service,


112-1083 East Kent Ave.
Diesel fuel pump parts


Vancouver, B.C.
Bolt on turbo kits


V5X 4V9


(604)324-1715





K & L Engineering*


6355 Smith Ave.


Mira Loma, CA 91725


(714)735-4182





Land Cruiser Advanced
Handling


N,S
Suspension Correction (Shackle


1029 S.E.24th
Reversal), Springs, Spring Over


Albany, OR 97321
Conversion


(541)926-8122





Land Cruiser Connection


N,S
Restoration, Repairs, Rebuilds, Custom


45661B Woodland Road
Fabrication, ARB/OME, Fibreglass Panels


Sterling, VA


(703) 404 8115


jasti@landcruiserconnection.com


http://www.landcruiserconnection.com/





Land Cruiser Recycling


N,U,V


PO Box 11727


Blacksburg, VA 24060-1727


(703)961-2053





Land Cruiser Solutions


Al Tubs, Grilles,
Tailgates, Fenders,


20 Thornell Rd.
Running Boards


Newton, NH 03858


(603)382-3555


LandCruiserSolutions.Inc@worldnet.att.net





Land Cruisers Unlimited


U,N,S
Steel 1/2 Doors, Tail Lights, Tire


E. 7555 Ohio Match Road
Carriers, FR/RR Discs, Bumpers


Rathdrun, ID 83858


(208)687-2607





Laughing Horse Design


12205 Lockey Lane Ste 12


Auburn, CA 95602


(916)888-8200





Lou Fusz Toyota


N,C
New Toyota Parts, Accessories, &


10725 Mancheser St.
Performance Parts


St Louis, MO, 63122


1-800-325-9581(CA/US)
(314)-966-5404


FUSZTOYOTA@aol.com





Malotte Manufacturing Co.,
Inc.


N,C
Fibreglass tubs, tops, fenders


PO Box 305


Lincoln, CA 95648


(916)645-8111





Man-A-Fre


N,U,M,C
6-1 Headers, Carbs, Toyota Parts,


5076 Chesebro Rd.
Rebuilt Parts, Lights, Springs,


Agoura, CA 91301
Shocks, LSD's, Old Man Emu, ARB,


(818)991-6689 FAX
(818)991-7105 Con-Ferr Advance Adapters


sysmgr@man-a-fre.com


http://www.man-a-fre.com/





Mark's Off Road
Enterprises


N,U,D,S,M


437 N. Moss Street


Burbank, CA 90501


(818)953-9230 FAX
(818)953-7225





Marlins Auto & Truck
Repair


S
Marlin Crawlers?


1543-B N. Maple


Fresno, CA 93703


(209)252-1584





Nairobi Outfitters
Extreme duty grillguards/winchmounts


PO Box 1211
Expedition quality vehicle


Goleta, Ca 93117
modifications/fabrication, tech support


(805)682-7933





National Spring


N
Custom springs/lift kits


Dept. OR


1402 N. Magnolia Ave.


El Cajon, CA 92020


(619)441-1901





Northwest Off-Road
Specialties


N,C,F
80 Series Accessories ONLY


1999 Iowa St.


Bellingham, WA 98226


(206)676-1200 FAX (206)
676-5401





Olympic Off Road


N,U,S,V,D


3735 S Pine Suite E


Tacoma, WA 98409


(206)473-5797





Ozone Off-Road, Inc.


N,U,S,C,V
Performance items, fibreglass bodies,


4623 Canyon Ridge Ln
V8 conv., suspension, frame mounted


Reno NV 89503
roll bars/cages





Performance Products


N,C


7658 Haskell Avenue


Van Nuys, CA, U.S.A.
91406-2005


(800)423-3173 FAX
(800)752-6196


performprod@msn.com





PowerTrax/Lock Right*


245 Fischer Ave. B-4


Costa Mesa, CA 92626


(800)562-5377 FAX
(714)545-5425


powertrax@aol.com





Pull Pal / Premier Power
Welder


S


P.O. Box 639


Carbondale, CO, U.S.A.
81623


(970)963-8875 FAX
(970)963-8875





Ramsey Winch Co.*


Winches?! :)


PO Box 581510


Tulsa, OK 74158


(918)438-2760 FAX
(918)438-6688





Renegade Fabrication
Service or Custom Work, Specialty


18447 N. 33rd Avenue
Products


Phoenix, AZ, U.S.A.
85023-1050


(602) 938-3185





R&M Specialty
Products*


Onboard hot-water
showers


PO Box 1683


Windsor, CA 95492


(707)838-3869





Rocky Mountain Offroad
Specialties


365 Bonny Street, Suite A


Grand Junction, CO, U.S.A.
81503


(800) 524-6005





Specter Off-Road, Inc.


N,U,M,C
New/Used Toyota USA/NON USA Parts


21600 Nordhoff St.
3-2-1 Headers, Conn-Ferr


Chatsworth, CA 91311


(818)882-1238 FAX
(818)882-7144


Specterlc@aol.com


http://www.sor.com/





Sterling McCall
Lexus/Toyota


10422 Southwest Freeway


Houston, TX, U.S.A. 77074


(713)995-2600 FAX
(713)995-2695





Stevens Creek Toyota, Inc.


N,S,V


4425 Stevens Creek Blvd.


Santa Clara, CA 95050-7395


(408)984-1234 FAX
(408)246-8028


http://www2.sctoyota.com





Sun Performance Products
Air compressors


17 Musick


Irvine, CA, U.S.A. 92718


(714) 588-8567, Fax: (714)
588-0142





TLC Restoration and Sales


S,V


14743 Oxnard Street
Owner: Johnathan Ward


Van Nuys, CA 91411
Restored FJ40s/60s/62s


(818)785-2200 FAX
(818)785-2209


http://www.tlc4x4.com/


jward@tlc4x4.com





TLC Mechanix
Owner: Adrian McGlaughlin


N,U,S,V
Power steering, disc brakes,


122 S. Lillie Lane
V8 conversions, suspensions, custom


Fayetteville, AR 72701
fabrication.


501-582-4TLC (4852)


TLCMEX@aol.com





TLC Offroad


N,U,S
New/Used Parts, ARB/OME, 24V bulbs,


2360 Douglas Rd.
Nippondenso glow plugs


Burnaby, BC


Canada


V5C 5B2


(604)299-5600


RAMullen@wimsey.com





Toyotas "R" Us


U,S


7730 CR 150


Salida, CO 81201


(719)539-7733





TPI Land Cruiser Parts And
Accessories


N,U


1042 Jasperson Drive


Madison, TN 37115


(615)865-4499 FAX
(615)860-6074


www.tpilandcruiser.com





Truck Sales Co. Off-Road
Center


N,U,M,S,V


2211 Dickerson Road


Nashville, TN 37207


(615)262-5850





Toyota Racing Development
(TRD U.A.A., Inc.)


355 East Baker


Costa Mesa, CA 92626


(714)444-1188


1(800)688-5913




Warden's Auto Repair


N,U,S,V
SM420-3 SPD TC adapter kits


640 Main St.
Bullet Proof CNC Milled Transfer


Placerville, CA 95667
Cases


(916)622-9242 FAX(909)
338-6709





W.E. For Wheel


N,U


PO Box 601


Crestline, CA 92325


(909)338-5120 FAX
(989)338-6709





21.2 Australia


--------------


Don Kyatt 4WD Parts &
Accessories


N,S
Direct importer of spare parts,


172 Roden St.
ARB Stockists


West Melbourne, Vic


AUSTRALIA 3003


(03)329-8200





177 Chesterville Rd.


Moorabbin, Vic


AUSTRALIA 3189


(03)555-0455





108 Regency Rd.


Ferryden Park, SA


AUSTRALIA 5010


(08)243-1966





Four Wheel Drives


N,U,C
Mail order world wide since 1955


304 Middleborough Rd.
If it's off a four wheel drive, they've


Blackburn, South Vic
got it and will get it to you


AUSTRALIA 3130


(03)9890-0500 FAX
(03)9898-6374


fwd@fwd.com.au


www.fwd.com.au





Leo's Cruisers
Early FJ40's and FJ55's, fibreglass body


2 Panamuna Ave
panels


Taylors Lakes


Victoria


AUSTRALIA 3038.


613 93902670 CELL 613 15
329433





Mark's Adapters


22 Sinclair Road


Dandenong, Victoria


AUSTRALIA 3175


(03) 9793 3388 (03) 9706
8148


marks4wd@ozemail.com.au


http://www.ozemail.com.au/~marks4wd/





malik4xxx@gmail.com




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Technical Specifications


1. Landcruiser 60 3F 1984




General Information


Make Toyota


Model Landcruiser 60 3F


Production Year 1984





Country


Designer


Production Number


Model Code


Model Family




Chassis and Dimensions


Chassis Type 4/5S ORV


Number of Doors 5


Wheelbase 2730 mm
(107.5 in)


Front Track 1470 mm
(57.9 in)


Rear Track 1460 mm
(57.5 in)


Length 4750 mm (187
in)


Width 1800 mm (70.9
in)


Height 1810 mm (71.3
in)


Ground Clearance 210 mm
(8.3 in)


Length / Wheelbase Ratio
1.74


Weight 1900 kg (4185
lb)


Weight Distribution
(front/rear) %52 / %48


Fuel Capacity 90.9 litre
(20 Imp gal , 24 US gal)




Aerodynamics


Drag Coefficient


Frontal Area


Cx




Engine Specifications


Engine Manufacturer Toyota


Engine Location Front


Engine Alignment
Longitudinal


Engine Construction


Coolant Type Water


Engine Type OHV


Number of Cylinders and
Placement S-6


Valves per Cylinder 2
(toplam 12 adet)


Engine Displacement 3995
cc (243.79 cu in)


Bore 94 mm (3.7 in)


Stroke 95 mm (3.74 in)


Bore / Stroke Ratio 0.99


Unitary Capacity 665.83
cc/cylinder (40.63 cu in/cylinder)


Number of Main Bearings 7


Compression Ratio 8 : 1


Fuel System Type 1 Ai carb


Aspiration Type Normal


Compressor Type -


Intercooler Type None


Catalytic Converter No


Maximum Engine Power 155
HP (115.6 kW)


Maximum Engine Power rpm
4200 d/d


Maximum Engine Torque 294
N.m (217 lb.ft , 30 kg.m)


Maximum Engine Torque rpm
2200 d/d


Engine Torque at Max.
Engine Power rpm 262.8 N.m (4200 d/d)


Power / Weight Ratio 81.6
HP/ton (60.8 W/kg)


Power / Engine
Displacement Ratio 38.8 HP/litre (28.9 kW/litre)


CO2 Emissions


Fuel Consumption




Performance


0 - 80 km/h


0 - 60 mph


0 - 100 km/h


0 - 160 km/h


80 - 120 km/h (in top
gear)


0 - 400 m Acceleration


0 - 1000 m Acceleration


Top Speed 155 km/h (96.3
mph)




Gearbox and Transmission


Transmission Type 2 x 5M


Top Gear Ratio 0.85 : 1


Final Drive Ratio 4.11 : 1


Drive Wheels 4WD




Handling, Suspension
Geometry and Brakes


Steering Type
recirculating ball


Steering Turns (lock to
lock) 4.3


Turning Circle Diameter
13.2 m (43.3 ft)


Suspension (front)
LA.SE.ARB.


Suspension (rear) LA.SE.


Brakes (front/rear)
VeDi/Dr-S


Brake Disc Diameter
(front)


Brake Disc Diameter (rear)


Wheels (front)


Wheels (rear)


Tyres (front)


Tyres (rear)













malik4xxx@gmail.com






Toyota LJ70







The Toyota Land Cruiser
Bundera was introduced with the rest of the 70-series in late 1984,
replacing the 40-series.





It is a lighter duty
Landcruiser than the rest of the 70 range, with smaller Hilux
differentials and drivetrain, and lower capacity engine options. It
was also Toyota's first attempt at a coil sprung 4wd, utilising the
same 5-link system found in the 80-series with radius arms and
Panhard rod. Whilst this suspension works quite effectively offroad,
with the short wheelbase it can lead to body pitch and roll onroad.
Good quality springs and shock absorbers help remedy this.





The Bundera entered the
newly emerging market niche of recreational 4wd's, more suited to the
odd weekend away than punishing long offroad trips or commercial use.





Pictured is a later model
(1990) Australian Bundera, evidence that Toyota toyed with the idea
of continuing marketing the vehicle here. Such vehicles, identifiable
by the square headlights and redesigned bonnet, are fairly rare
locally [au] but were sold in overseas markets up until around 1993.


- Bilbo B' [5/'00]





Toyota Bundera 1984 - 1989


2 door, soft top or
hardtop, 2+3 seats


loa: 346mm, width: 1690mm,
wheelbase: 2310mm (90") track: 1425mm/1420mm, grnd clearance:
230mm turning radius: 6.5m (kerb)


petrol: (RJ70...)


22R 2367cc petrol 4cyls
2-valves/cyl sohc


bore: 92mm, stroke: 89mm,
c.r.: 9.0:1


power: 105 HP at 4800rpm,
torque: 136 Ft-Lb at 2800rpm


diesel: (LJ70...)


2L 2446cc diesel 4cyls
2-valves/cyl sohc


bore: 92mm, stroke: 92mm,
c.r.: 22.3:1


power: 72 HP at 4000rpm,
torque: 115 Ft-Lb at 2200rpm


and


2L-T 2446cc turbo diesel
4cyls 2-valves/cyl sohc


bore: 92mm, stroke: 92mm,
c.r.: 20.0:1


power: 86 HP at 4000rpm,
torque: 139 Ft-Lb at 2400rpm


transmission: 5m (G52 or
R150F in turbo model) gearbox, part-time 4WD, 2-speed transfer case.


suspension:
live-coil/live-coil, brakes: disc/drum


tyres: 7.50R16 or
265/65r15, fuel-tank: 90L


Note: dimensions given for
hard-top.


Competition: Nissan GQ
SWB, Daihatsu Rocky, Mitsubishi Pajero or Holden Jackaroo SWB


Go to the 70-series and
Toyota (main) page




------------------------------------------------------------------------


Toyota ›
Landcruiser 70 LX1984 - Toyota - Landcruiser 70 LXAll Technical
Specifications Technical Specs of This Model


1. Landcruiser 70 LX 1984









General Information


Make Toyota


Model Landcruiser 70 LX


Production Year 1984


Country


Designer


Production Number


Model Code


Model Family




Chassis and Dimensions


Chassis Type 4/5S ORV


Number of Doors 3


Wheelbase 2600 mm
(102.4 in)


Front Track 1420 mm
(55.9 in)


Rear Track 1420 mm
(55.9 in)


Length 4260 mm (167.7
in)


Width 1690 mm (66.5
in)


Height 1900 mm (74.8
in)


Ground Clearance 180 mm
(7.1 in)


Length / Wheelbase Ratio
1.64


Weight 1820 kg (4008.8
lb)


Weight Distribution
(front/rear)


Fuel Capacity 90 litre
(19.8 Imp gal , 23.8 US gal)




Aerodynamics


Drag Coefficient


Frontal Area


Cx




Engine Specifications


Engine Manufacturer Toyota


Engine Location Front


Engine Alignment
Longitudinal


Engine Construction


Coolant Type Water


Engine Type OHV


Number of Cylinders and
Placement S-4


Valves per Cylinder 2
(toplam 8 adet)


Engine Displacement 3431
cc (209.37 cu in)


Bore 102 mm (4.02 in)


Stroke 105 mm (4.13
in)


Bore / Stroke Ratio 0.97


Unitary Capacity 857.75
cc/cylinder (52.34 cu in/cylinder)


Number of Main Bearings 5


Compression Ratio 20 : 1


Fuel System Type Bo VE
Diesel pump


Aspiration Type Normal D.


Compressor Type -


Intercooler Type None


Catalytic Converter No


Maximum Engine Power 98 HP
(73.1 kW)


Maximum Engine Power rpm
3500 d/d


Maximum Engine Torque 255
N.m (188.2 lb.ft , 26 kg.m)


Maximum Engine Torque rpm
2200 d/d


Engine Torque at Max.
Engine Power rpm 199.4 N.m (3500 d/d)


Power / Weight Ratio 53.8
HP/ton (40.2 W/kg)


Power / Engine
Displacement Ratio 28.6 HP/litre (21.3 kW/litre)


CO2 Emissions


Fuel Consumption




Performance


0 - 80 km/h


0 - 60 mph


0 - 100 km/h


0 - 160 km/h


80 - 120 km/h (in top
gear)


0 - 400 m Acceleration


0 - 1000 m Acceleration


Top Speed




Gearbox and Transmission


Transmission Type 2 x 5M


Top Gear Ratio 0.85 : 1


Final Drive Ratio 4.11 : 1


Drive Wheels 4WD




Handling, Suspension
Geometry and Brakes


Steering Type
recirculating ball PAS


Steering Turns (lock to
lock) 3.3











-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


















Make Toyota


Model Land Cruiser II 2.4
Tubodiesel SW LJ70





Model
Land Cruiser II 2.4 Tubodiesel SW LJ70


Production Year 1992


Country


Designer


Production Number


Model Code


Model Family




Chassis and Dimensions


Chassis Type 4/5S ORV


Number of Doors 3


Wheelbase 2310 mm
(90.9 in)


Front Track 1415 mm
(55.7 in)


Rear Track 1400 mm
(55.1 in)


Length 3970 mm (156.3
in)


Width 1690 mm (66.5
in)


Height 1880 mm (74 in)


Ground Clearance 205 mm
(8.1 in)


Length / Wheelbase Ratio
1.72


Weight 1800 kg (3964.8
lb)


Weight Distribution
(front/rear)


Fuel Capacity 90 litre
(19.8 Imp gal , 23.8 US gal)




Aerodynamics


Drag Coefficient


Frontal Area


Cx




Engine Specifications


Engine Manufacturer Toyota


Engine Location Front


Engine Alignment
Longitudinal


Engine Construction


Coolant Type Water


Engine Type OHV


Number of Cylinders and
Placement S-4


Valves per Cylinder 2
(toplam 8 adet)


Engine Displacement 2446
cc (149.26 cu in)


Bore 92 mm (3.62 in)


Stroke 92 mm (3.62 in)


Bore / Stroke Ratio 1


Unitary Capacity 611.5
cc/cylinder (37.32 cu in/cylinder)


Number of Main Bearings 5


Compression Ratio 21 : 1


Fuel System Type Bo diesel
pump


Aspiration Type Turbo D.


Compressor Type


Intercooler Type


Catalytic Converter No


Maximum Engine Power 90 HP
(67.1 kW)


Maximum Engine Power rpm
3500 d/d


Maximum Engine Torque 215
N.m (158.7 lb.ft , 21.9 kg.m)


Maximum Engine Torque rpm
2400 d/d


Engine Torque at Max.
Engine Power rpm 183.1 N.m (3500 d/d)


Power / Weight Ratio 50
HP/ton (37.3 W/kg)


Power / Engine
Displacement Ratio 36.8 HP/litre (27.4 kW/litre)


CO2 Emissions


Fuel Consumption




Performance


0 - 80 km/h


0 - 60 mph


0 - 100 km/h


0 - 160 km/h


80 - 120 km/h (in top
gear)


0 - 400 m Acceleration


0 - 1000 m Acceleration 46
s


Top Speed 135 km/h (83.9
mph)




Gearbox and Transmission


Transmission Type 5M


Top Gear Ratio 0.85 : 1


Final Drive Ratio 4.88 : 1


Drive Wheels 4WD




Handling, Suspension
Geometry and Brakes


Steering Type
recirculating ball PAS


Steering Turns (lock to
lock)


Turning Circle Diameter


Suspension (front)


Suspension (rear)


Brakes (front/rear)
Di/Dr-S


Brake Disc Diameter
(front)


Brake Disc Diameter (rear)


Wheels (front)


Wheels (rear)


Tyres (front)


Tyres (rear)










PROVIDED BY
MALIK4XXX@GMAIL.COM


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------





















Toyota ›
Landcruiser 70 1984













Make Toyota


Model Landcruiser 70


Production Year 1984


Country


Designer


Production Number


Model Code


Model Family




Chassis and Dimensions


Chassis Type 4/5S ORV


Number of Doors 3


Wheelbase 2310 mm
(90.9 in)


Front Track 1410 mm
(55.5 in)


Rear Track 1410 mm
(55.5 in)


Length 3970 mm (156.3
in)


Width 1690 mm (66.5
in)


Height 1900 mm (74.8
in)


Ground Clearance 210 mm
(8.3 in)


Length / Wheelbase Ratio
1.72


Weight 1740 kg (3832.6
lb)


Weight Distribution
(front/rear) %52 / %48


Fuel Capacity 90 litre
(19.8 Imp gal , 23.8 US gal)




Aerodynamics


Drag Coefficient


Frontal Area


Cx




Engine Specifications


Engine Manufacturer Toyota


Engine Location Front


Engine Alignment
Longitudinal


Engine Construction


Coolant Type Water


Engine Type OHV


Number of Cylinders and
Placement S-4


Valves per Cylinder 2
(toplam 8 adet)


Engine Displacement 3431
cc (209.37 cu in)


Bore 102 mm (4.02 in)


Stroke 105 mm (4.13
in)


Bore / Stroke Ratio 0.97


Unitary Capacity 857.75
cc/cylinder (52.34 cu in/cylinder)


Number of Main Bearings 5


Compression Ratio 20 : 1


Fuel System Type Bo VE
Diesel pump


Aspiration Type Normal D.


Compressor Type -


Intercooler Type None


Catalytic Converter No


Maximum Engine Power 98 HP
(73.1 kW)


Maximum Engine Power rpm
3500 d/d


Maximum Engine Torque 255
N.m (188.2 lb.ft , 26 kg.m)


Maximum Engine Torque rpm
2200 d/d


Engine Torque at Max.
Engine Power rpm 199.4 N.m (3500 d/d)


Power / Weight Ratio 56.3
HP/ton (42 W/kg)


Power / Engine
Displacement Ratio 28.6 HP/litre (21.3 kW/litre)


CO2 Emissions


Fuel Consumption




Performance


0 - 80 km/h


0 - 60 mph


0 - 100 km/h


0 - 160 km/h


80 - 120 km/h (in top
gear)


0 - 400 m Acceleration


0 - 1000 m Acceleration


Top Speed




Gearbox and Transmission


Transmission Type 2 x 5M


Top Gear Ratio 0.85 : 1


Final Drive Ratio 4.11 : 1


Drive Wheels 4WD




Handling, Suspension
Geometry and Brakes


Steering Type
recirculating ball


Steering Turns (lock to
lock) 4.1


Turning Circle Diameter
10.6 m (34.8 ft)


Suspension (front) LA.SE.


Suspension (rear) LA.SE.


Brakes (front/rear)
VeDi/Dr-S


Brake Disc Diameter
(front)


Brake Disc Diameter (rear)


Wheels (front)


Wheels (rear)


Tyres (front)


Tyres (rear)







------------------------------------------------------------------------


------------------------------------------------------------------------










Toyota › Landcruiser II
3.0 TD1994






1. Land Cruiser II 2.4
Tubodiesel SW LJ70 1992


General Information


Make Toyota


Model Landcruiser II 3.0
TD


Production Year 1994


Country


Designer


Production Number


Model Code


Model Family




Chassis and Dimensions


Chassis Type 4/5S ORV


Number of Doors 3


Wheelbase 2310 mm
(90.9 in)


Front Track


Rear Track


Length 4125 mm (162.4
in)


Width 1790 mm (70.5
in)


Height 1915 mm (75.4
in)


Ground Clearance


Length / Wheelbase Ratio
1.79


Weight 2000 kg (4405.3
lb)


Weight Distribution
(front/rear)


Fuel Capacity 90 litre
(19.8 Imp gal , 23.8 US gal)




Aerodynamics


Drag Coefficient


Frontal Area


Cx




Engine Specifications


Engine Manufacturer Toyota


Engine Location Front


Engine Alignment
Longitudinal


Engine Construction


Coolant Type Water


Engine Type SOHC


Number of Cylinders and
Placement S-4


Valves per Cylinder 2
(toplam 8 adet)


Engine Displacement 2982
cc (181.97 cu in)


Bore 96 mm (3.78 in)


Stroke 103 mm (4.06
in)


Bore / Stroke Ratio 0.93


Unitary Capacity 745.5
cc/cylinder (45.49 cu in/cylinder)


Number of Main Bearings


Compression Ratio 21.2 : 1


Fuel System Type


Aspiration Type Turbo D.


Compressor Type


Intercooler Type


Catalytic Converter No


Maximum Engine Power 123
HP (91.7 kW)


Maximum Engine Power rpm
3600 d/d


Maximum Engine Torque 295
N.m (217.7 lb.ft , 30.1 kg.m)


Maximum Engine Torque rpm
2000 d/d


Engine Torque at Max.
Engine Power rpm 243.3 N.m (3600 d/d)


Power / Weight Ratio 61.5
HP/ton (45.9 W/kg)


Power / Engine
Displacement Ratio 41.2 HP/litre (30.8 kW/litre)


CO2 Emissions


Fuel Consumption




Performance


0 - 80 km/h


0 - 60 mph 16.4 s


0 - 100 km/h


0 - 160 km/h


80 - 120 km/h (in top
gear)


0 - 400 m Acceleration


0 - 1000 m Acceleration


Top Speed 150 km/h (93.2
mph)




Gearbox and Transmission


Transmission Type 2 x 5M


Top Gear Ratio


Final Drive Ratio 4.3 : 1



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Toyota › Mega Cruiser1995 - Toyota - Mega CruiserAll Technical
Specifications Technical Specs of This Model


1. Mega Cruiser 1995







General Information


Make Toyota


Model Mega Cruiser


Production Year 1995


Country


Designer


Production Number


Model Code


Model Family




Chassis and Dimensions


Chassis Type 6/8S ORV


Number of Doors 4


Wheelbase 3395 mm
(133.7 in)


Front Track


Rear Track


Length 5130 mm (202
in)


Width 2170 mm (85.4
in)


Height 2285 mm (90 in)


Ground Clearance 420 mm
(16.5 in)


Length / Wheelbase Ratio
1.51


Weight 2850 kg (6277.5
lb)


Weight Distribution
(front/rear)


Fuel Capacity 108 litre
(23.8 Imp gal , 28.5 US gal)




Aerodynamics


Drag Coefficient


Frontal Area


Cx




Engine Specifications


Engine Manufacturer Toyota


Engine Location Front


Engine Alignment
Longitudinal


Engine Construction


Coolant Type Water


Engine Type SOHC


Number of Cylinders and
Placement S-6


Valves per Cylinder 2
(toplam 12 adet)


Engine Displacement 4164
cc (254.1 cu in)


Bore


Stroke


Bore / Stroke Ratio


Unitary Capacity 694
cc/cylinder (42.35 cu in/cylinder)


Number of Main Bearings


Compression Ratio


Fuel System Type


Aspiration Type Turbo D.


Compressor Type


Intercooler Type Yes


Catalytic Converter


Maximum Engine Power 136
HP (101.4 kW)


Maximum Engine Power rpm
3200 d/d


Maximum Engine Torque 382
N.m (281.9 lb.ft , 39 kg.m)


Maximum Engine Torque rpm
2000 d/d


Engine Torque at Max.
Engine Power rpm 302.6 N.m (3200 d/d)


Power / Weight Ratio 47.7
HP/ton (35.6 W/kg)


Power / Engine
Displacement Ratio 32.7 HP/litre (24.4 kW/litre)


CO2 Emissions


Fuel Consumption




Performance


0 - 80 km/h


0 - 60 mph


0 - 100 km/h


0 - 160 km/h


80 - 120 km/h (in top
gear)


0 - 400 m Acceleration


0 - 1000 m Acceleration


Top Speed




Gearbox and Transmission


Transmission Type 4A


Top Gear Ratio


Final Drive Ratio


Drive Wheels 4WD




Handling, Suspension
Geometry and Brakes


Steering Type 4 wheel
steering


Steering Turns (lock to
lock)


Turning Circle Diameter
11.2 m (36.7 ft)


Suspension (front)
I.DW.TB.


Suspension (rear) I.DW.TB.


Brakes (front/rear)


Brake Disc Diameter
(front)


Brake Disc Diameter (rear)


Wheels (front)


Wheels (rear)


Tyres (front)


Tyres (rear)






Drive Wheels 4WD




Handling, Suspension
Geometry and Brakes


Steering Type ball &
nut PAS


Steering Turns (lock to
lock) 3.4


Turning Circle Diameter
10.6 m (34.8 ft)


Suspension (front)
LA.LA.LatLi.CS.


Suspension (rear)
LA.TA.LatLi.CS.


Brakes (front/rear)
Di/Dr-S


Brake Disc Diameter
(front)


Brake Disc Diameter (rear)


Wheels (front)



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Toyota ›
FJ Cruiser2006 - Toyota - FJ CruiserAll





1. FJ Cruiser 2006


General Information


Make Toyota


Model FJ Cruiser


Production Year 2006


Country


Designer


Production Number


Model Code


Model Family




Chassis and Dimensions


Chassis Type 4/5S ORV


Number of Doors 5


Wheelbase 2690 mm
(105.9 in)


Front Track 1605 mm
(63.2 in)


Rear Track 1605 mm
(63.2 in)


Length 4671 mm (183.9
in)


Width 1895 mm (74.6
in)


Height 1819 mm (71.6
in)


Ground Clearance 244 mm
(9.6 in)


Length / Wheelbase Ratio
1.74


Weight 1946 kg (4286.3
lb)


Weight Distribution
(front/rear)


Fuel Capacity 72 litre
(15.8 Imp gal , 19 US gal)




Aerodynamics


Drag Coefficient 0.4


Frontal Area


Cx




Engine Specifications


Engine Manufacturer Toyota


Engine Location Front


Engine Alignment
Longitudinal


Engine Construction
aluminium alloy block & head


Coolant Type Water


Engine Type DOHC


Number of Cylinders and
Placement V-6


Valves per Cylinder 4
(toplam 24 adet)


Engine Displacement 3956
cc (241.41 cu in)


Bore 94 mm (3.7 in)


Stroke 95 mm (3.74 in)


Bore / Stroke Ratio 0.99


Unitary Capacity 659.33
cc/cylinder (40.24 cu in/cylinder)


Number of Main Bearings


Compression Ratio 10 : 1


Fuel System Type SFi


Aspiration Type Normal


Compressor Type -


Intercooler Type None


Catalytic Converter Yes


Maximum Engine Power 239
HP (178.2 kW)


Maximum Engine Power rpm
5200 d/d


Maximum Engine Torque 377
N.m (278.2 lb.ft , 38.5 kg.m)


Maximum Engine Torque rpm
3700 d/d


Engine Torque at Max.
Engine Power rpm 327.3 N.m (5200 d/d)


Power / Weight Ratio 122.8
HP/ton (91.6 W/kg)


Power / Engine
Displacement Ratio 60.4 HP/litre (45.1 kW/litre)


CO2 Emissions


Fuel Consumption




Performance


0 - 80 km/h


0 - 60 mph


0 - 100 km/h


0 - 160 km/h


80 - 120 km/h (in top
gear)


0 - 400 m Acceleration


0 - 1000 m Acceleration


Top Speed




Gearbox and Transmission


Transmission Type 6M


Top Gear Ratio 0.8 : 1


Final Drive Ratio 3.61 : 1


Drive Wheels 4WD




Handling, Suspension
Geometry and Brakes


Steering Type rack &
pinion VPAS


Steering Turns (lock to
lock) 3


Turning Circle Diameter


Suspension (front)
I.DW.ARB.


Suspension (rear)
I.4Li.CS.ARB.


Brakes (front/rear)
VeDi/VeDi-S-ABS


Brake Disc Diameter
(front) 320 mm


Brake Disc Diameter (rear)
312 mm


Wheels (front) 7.5 x 17


Wheels (rear) 7.5 x 17


Tyres (front) P265/70 R 17


Tyres (rear) P265/70 R 17










--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------








Toyota ›
FJ Cruiser 4WD Automatic2006



FJ Cruiser 4WD Automatic 2006


General Information


Make Toyota


Model FJ Cruiser 4WD
Automatic


Production Year 2006


Country


Designer


Production Number


Model Code


Model Family




Chassis and Dimensions


Chassis Type 4/5S ORV


Number of Doors 5


Wheelbase 2690 mm
(105.9 in)


Front Track 1605 mm
(63.2 in)


Rear Track 1605 mm
(63.2 in)


Length 4671 mm (183.9
in)


Width 1895 mm (74.6
in)


Height 1819 mm (71.6
in)


Ground Clearance 244 mm
(9.6 in)


Length / Wheelbase Ratio
1.74


Weight 1948 kg (4290.7
lb)


Weight Distribution
(front/rear)


Fuel Capacity 72 litre
(15.8 Imp gal , 19 US gal)




Aerodynamics


Drag Coefficient 0.4


Frontal Area


Cx




Engine Specifications


Engine Manufacturer Toyota


Engine Location Front


Engine Alignment
Longitudinal


Engine Construction
aluminium alloy block & head


Coolant Type Water


Engine Type DOHC


Number of Cylinders and
Placement V-6


Valves per Cylinder 4
(toplam 24 adet)


Engine Displacement 3956
cc (241.41 cu in)


Bore 94 mm (3.7 in)


Stroke 95 mm (3.74 in)


Bore / Stroke Ratio 0.99


Unitary Capacity 659.33
cc/cylinder (40.24 cu in/cylinder)


Number of Main Bearings


Compression Ratio 10 : 1


Fuel System Type SFi


Aspiration Type Normal


Compressor Type -


Intercooler Type None


Catalytic Converter Yes


Maximum Engine Power 239
HP (178.2 kW)


Maximum Engine Power rpm
5200 d/d


Maximum Engine Torque 377
N.m (278.2 lb.ft , 38.5 kg.m)


Maximum Engine Torque rpm
3700 d/d


Engine Torque at Max.
Engine Power rpm 327.3 N.m (5200 d/d)


Power / Weight Ratio 122.7
HP/ton (91.5 W/kg)


Power / Engine
Displacement Ratio 60.4 HP/litre (45.1 kW/litre)


CO2 Emissions


Fuel Consumption




Performance


0 - 80 km/h


0 - 60 mph


0 - 100 km/h


0 - 160 km/h


80 - 120 km/h (in top
gear)


0 - 400 m Acceleration


0 - 1000 m Acceleration


Top Speed




Gearbox and Transmission


Transmission Type 5A


Top Gear Ratio 0.72 : 1


Final Drive Ratio 3.73 : 1


Drive Wheels 4WD




Handling, Suspension
Geometry and Brakes


Steering Type rack &
pinion VPAS


Steering Turns (lock to
lock) 3


Turning Circle Diameter


Suspension (front)
I.DW.ARB.


Suspension (rear)
I.4Li.CS.ARB.


Brakes (front/rear)
VeDi/VeDi-S-ABS


Brake Disc Diameter
(front) 320 mm


Brake Disc Diameter (rear)
312 mm


Wheels (front) 7.5 x 17


Wheels (rear) 7.5 x 17


Tyres (front) P265/70 R 17


Tyres (rear) P265/70 R 17










----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------











------------------------------------------------------------------------









-----------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------------------------------------------








› Toyota › Landcruiser Estate1976


1. Landcruiser Estate 1976






General Information


Make Toyota


Model Landcruiser Estate


Production Year 1976


Country


Designer


Production Number


Model Code


Model Family




Chassis and Dimensions


Chassis Type 4/5S ORV


Number of Doors 5


Wheelbase 2648 mm
(104.3 in)


Front Track 1403 mm
(55.2 in)


Rear Track 1397 mm (55
in)


Length 4686 mm (184.5
in)


Width 1689 mm (66.5
in)


Height 1867 mm (73.5
in)


Ground Clearance 203 mm
(8 in)


Length / Wheelbase Ratio
1.77


Weight 1848 kg (4070.5
lb)


Weight Distribution
(front/rear)


Fuel Capacity 81.8 litre
(18 Imp gal , 21.6 US gal)




Aerodynamics


Drag Coefficient


Frontal Area


Cx




Engine Specifications


Engine Manufacturer Toyota


Engine Location Front


Engine Alignment
Longitudinal


Engine Construction


Coolant Type Water


Engine Type OHV


Number of Cylinders and
Placement S-6


Valves per Cylinder 2
(toplam 12 adet)


Engine Displacement 4230
cc (258.13 cu in)


Bore 94 mm (3.7 in)


Stroke 102 mm (4.02
in)


Bore / Stroke Ratio 0.92


Unitary Capacity 705
cc/cylinder (43.02 cu in/cylinder)


Number of Main Bearings


Compression Ratio 7.8 : 1


Fuel System Type 1 Ai carb


Aspiration Type Normal


Compressor Type -


Intercooler Type None


Catalytic Converter No


Maximum Engine Power 135
HP (100.7 kW)


Maximum Engine Power rpm
3600 d/d


Maximum Engine Torque 285
N.m (210.3 lb.ft , 29.1 kg.m)


Maximum Engine Torque rpm
1800 d/d


Engine Torque at Max.
Engine Power rpm 267 N.m (3600 d/d)


Power / Weight Ratio 73.1
HP/ton (54.5 W/kg)


Power / Engine
Displacement Ratio 31.9 HP/litre (23.8 kW/litre)


CO2 Emissions


Fuel Consumption




Performance


0 - 80 km/h


0 - 60 mph


0 - 100 km/h


0 - 160 km/h


80 - 120 km/h (in top
gear)


0 - 400 m Acceleration


0 - 1000 m Acceleration


Top Speed




Gearbox and Transmission


Transmission Type 4M


Top Gear Ratio 1 : 1


Final Drive Ratio 3.7 : 1


Drive Wheels 4WD




Handling, Suspension
Geometry and Brakes


Steering Type
recirculating ball


Steering Turns (lock to
lock)


Turning Circle Diameter


Suspension (front) LA.SE.


Suspension (rear) LA.SE.


Brakes (front/rear)
Dr/Dr-S


Brake Disc Diameter
(front)


Brake Disc Diameter (rear)


Wheels (front)


Wheels (rear)


Tyres (front)


Tyres (rear)


Brake Disc Diameter
(front) 320 mm


Brake Disc Diameter (rear)
312 mm


Wheels (front) 7.5 x 17


Wheels (rear) 7.5 x 17


Tyres (front) P265/70 R 17


Tyres (rear) P265/70 R 17




MALIK4XXX@GMAIL.COM


---------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MODEL
70





The
First Transfiguration in 30 Years


The
pressure from the preceding model sales volume was enormous. However,
the 70 series was able evolve the Land Cruiser while maintaining the
images of rigidity, reliability, and durability of the past. Without
major alterations to the basic structure, many small details that
pioneered the path to modernization were added on.




















Production
Period 
1984-



*Production
period in Japan.
The period of introduction for this generation
model may vary by region.



































In
1984 a new 70-series was born, bringing to a close a long era of 29
years (including the 20-series) during which the 40-series remained
virtually unchanged. There were limits to what could be done to
modernize the old design of the 40-series model. For this reason
Chief Engineer Masaomi Yoshii introduced a complete overhaul in the
design, producing the 70-series to lead the Land Cruiser with a new
generation.


The
first pre-condition however was that the new Land Cruiser was not to
sacrifice any of its toughness, so a strong ladder frame was outfit
with rigid leaf springs. The body plates were thickened by 1.0mm for
added strength. While leaving something of the image of the
40-series, such as externally added fenders, it was also given modern
features such as curved glass. As before there were two body types
available, the short BJ70 (soft top and van), and the middle BJ73
(FRP top).


In
1985 a derivative of the BJ70 model was added, the LJ71G, which had a
2L-T-type engine (4-cylinder, 2,446cc, 85PS, 19.2kgm). As indicated
by the letter G, this model was registered as a passenger car type
wagon. It had a soft appearance in the front mask, and the suspension
had rigid coil springs. In the export model it was known as the Light
Land Cruiser, or the Land Cruiser II. Moreover, this was the same
engine that was installed in the 4 Runner


At
that time the BJ70 lineup was also expanded with the addition of the
BJ71 and BJ74, which had a 13B-T-type turbo diesel engine. The BJ74
LX grade also came with automatic transmission.


Later
the Land Cruiser shifted its weight to the 60-series. In competition
to outdo its rival model the Pajero in terms of luxury, the 60-series
evolved into the 80-series. During this period the 70-series tended
to fade into the background.


Then
in 1990 a significant minor change was introduced in the 70-series,
when two newly developed engines were introduced; the 1PZ-type engine
(replacing the 3B-type with an OHC 5-cylinder, 3,469cc, 115PS,
23.5kgm engine specs), and the 1HZ-type engine (replacing the 13B-T
with an OHC 6-cylinder, 4,163cc, 135PS, 28.5kgm engine specs).
Moreover, to the middle length model a new ZX grade was added. Both
the PZJ70 short and the HZJ73 underwent modifications.


Following
that in the same year the 70-series wagon underwent a complete
makeover. In addition to the original 2-door, a 4-door semi-long was
introduced, the name was changed to the Prado, and with other design
changes it took on its own unique identity. The 4-door model had 3
rows of seats and could carry 8 people. Compared to the 70-series
that was registered as a commercial vehicle, it now had more
potential reclassified as an RV. The 2L-T-type was transformed with
electronic controls in the new 2L-TE-type engine, which gave it
improved performance. With the minor change the short version kept
its LJ71 number, while the long version was renamed the LJ78. At this
time also appeared a 4-door semi-long, with a choice of two engines
the 1PZ or the 1HZ named accordingly the PZJ77 and the HZJ77.


In
1991 the Prado semi-long had a wide body version added to the lineup.
In 1993 the short also had a wide body version added, and a newly
developed engine was added, the 1KZ-TE (2,982cc, NET130PS, 29.5kgm).
All of this meant major improvements in performance. In 1994 the
1PZ-type engine was dropped from the van series, leaving only the 1HZ
type of engine.





With
the full model change in 1996 it embarked on a new and independent
path as the Prado. The van type underwent a series of minor changes,
taking on front rigid coil springs in 1999, leading up to the present
day.


Toyota LJ70







The Toyota Land Cruiser
Bundera was introduced with the rest of the 70-series in late 1984,
replacing the 40-series.





It is a lighter duty
Landcruiser than the rest of the 70 range, with smaller Hilux
differentials and drivetrain, and lower capacity engine options. It
was also Toyota's first attempt at a coil sprung 4wd, utilising the
same 5-link system found in the 80-series with radius arms and
Panhard rod. Whilst this suspension works quite effectively offroad,
with the short wheelbase it can lead to body pitch and roll onroad.
Good quality springs and shock absorbers help remedy this.





The Bundera entered the
newly emerging market niche of recreational 4wd's, more suited to the
odd weekend away than punishing long offroad trips or commercial use.





Pictured is a later model
(1990) Australian Bundera, evidence that Toyota toyed with the idea
of continuing marketing the vehicle here. Such vehicles, identifiable
by the square headlights and redesigned bonnet, are fairly rare
locally [au] but were sold in overseas markets up until around 1993.


- Bilbo B' [5/'00]





Toyota Bundera 1984 - 1989


2 door, soft top or
hardtop, 2+3 seats


loa: 346mm, width: 1690mm,
wheelbase: 2310mm (90") track: 1425mm/1420mm, grnd clearance:
230mm turning radius: 6.5m (kerb)


petrol: (RJ70...)


22R 2367cc petrol 4cyls
2-valves/cyl sohc


bore: 92mm, stroke: 89mm,
c.r.: 9.0:1


power: 105 HP at 4800rpm,
torque: 136 Ft-Lb at 2800rpm


diesel: (LJ70...)


2L 2446cc diesel 4cyls
2-valves/cyl sohc


bore: 92mm, stroke: 92mm,
c.r.: 22.3:1


power: 72 HP at 4000rpm,
torque: 115 Ft-Lb at 2200rpm


and


2L-T 2446cc turbo diesel
4cyls 2-valves/cyl sohc


bore: 92mm, stroke: 92mm,
c.r.: 20.0:1


power: 86 HP at 4000rpm,
torque: 139 Ft-Lb at 2400rpm


transmission: 5m (G52 or
R150F in turbo model) gearbox, part-time 4WD, 2-speed transfer case.


suspension:
live-coil/live-coil, brakes: disc/drum


tyres: 7.50R16 or
265/65r15, fuel-tank: 90L


Note: dimensions given for
hard-top.


Competition: Nissan GQ
SWB, Daihatsu Rocky, Mitsubishi Pajero or Holden Jackaroo SWB


Go to the 70-series and
Toyota (main) page























Some other resources, if
you are interested in researching the Landcruiser further, are:





http://www1.toyota.com/landcruiser/
(Toyota Webpage)





http://www.tlca.org/
(Toyota Landcruiser Association)





http://www.cruizers.com/
(All Landcruiser Sales & Info)





http://www.suv.com/toyota/landcruisers/
(SUV Online’s links to Landcruiser Parts & Other
Information)





http://www.autoweb.com.au/start_135/showall_/id_TOY/doc_toy9803261/article.html
(Autoweb article on new landcruisers)





http://www.edmunds.com/edweb/newtrucks/2000/toyota/landcruiser/base.html#specs
(Edmund’s Landcruiser Page)





http://www.nrma.com.au/Page/Public?PageId=CTToyotaLandcruiserApr98P
(Landcruiser Crash Test Data – note this was conducted on the
Australian version, without airbags)





http://www.crashtest.com/toyota_truck/index.htm


(crashtest data on
Landcruisers)





http://carpoint.msn.com/Vip/Safety/Toyota/Land%20Cruiser/2000.asp








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